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(showing articles 1 to 50 of 50)

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    Brücke 49 Hotel Pension, a modern-rustic, four-room guest house in the alpine spa town of Vals, is exactly where we'd like to be right now. Located in a 1902 house with four guest rooms, the B & B is the work of Ruth Kramer and Thomas Schacht, a Swiss-Danish couple who traded careers in Denmark—she as a designer, he as a business developer—for mountain village living. They restored and designed the place themselves: It's not fancy," they say, "just very personal with a lot of thought going into what we think will give you a cozy feeling." From what we've seen, they got that last part exactly right. For more information, go to Brücke 49 Hotel Pension.

      Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: The century-old house is painted slate gray with white shutters. Vals is a historic Alpine village with a population of 950 (mostly farmers and craftspeople, say Ruth and Thomas). It's situated in the country's largest canton, Graubünden, not far from the borders of Austria and Italy, and has a five-lift ski resort and an extraordinary thermal hot springs resort, Therme Vals, designed by architect Peter Zumthor (day visitors welcome). Read about the spa in our post Poetry in Space: Vals Thermal Spa in Switzerland.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: We love the B & B's glossy black front door. The house had been damaged by a fire before Ruth and Thomas took over; they've resuscitated every inch of it.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: Vals is famous for its limestone, and the entrance of the house has its original, locally quarried stone floor and stairs. The couple painted the walls in a charcoal gray that carries over from the exterior. We like the way they paired it with doors in a soft brown. The side chair was in the house when they bought it, and is emblematic of the way Ruth and Thomas introduced a mix of old and new: they upholstered the seat in a Paul Smith stripe from Kvadrat.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: All of the floors in the house, including the living room, shown here, are original wide-plank pine—"long, massive planks that came from the local woods." The couple added new panels to the walls in the old style. The rug-free room is furnished with Danish clasics, including a 1940s armchair by Finn Juhl.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: Guests are not only welcome in the stainless-steel-appointed kitchen but encouraged to cook if inclined. Note the apples stored in a wooden crate on the floor.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: A guest room under the eaves. The B & B sleeps a maximum of 10 people.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above L: A turn-of-the-century doorknob with its original key. Above R: A bentwood chair hung on a peg rack in a bedroom.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: A patchwork-upholsted vintage Danish chair in a guest room.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: A case for the (nearly) all-white bathroom.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: A montage of Brücke 49 details: including tasseled towels designed by Ruth and made for the B & B by a friend in Turkey, a Royal Copehagen mug, and a window railing—"a little bent and bitten by time."

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: Breakfast at Brücke 49 is served on Royal Copenhagen's hand-painted Multi-Colored Elements porcelain. Yes, that's the B & B's signature homemade bread and muesli with yogurt and fresh fruit. 

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: An alpine arrangement that we plan to replicate.

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: The 1902 knob on a bathroom window. The couple went to enormous trouble to restore the house's details—though this closure is original, "the rest is handmade new" to fit it, explains Thomas, and includes old handblown glass "which makes looking through the windows a little unsharp."

    Brucke 49 guest house Vals Switzerland | Remodelista

    Above: Folding wooden chairs for taking in the mountain air year round. For rates and reservations, go to Brücke 49 Hotel Pension.

    For more design and travel inspiration, browse our posts on standout lodgings around the world. And don't miss, For Rent: A Ski Cabin by Peter Zumthor, World-Renowned Swiss Architect.


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    Care to stay in the home of internationally renowned Swiss architect (and Pritzker Prize winner) Peter Zumthor? Architectural enthusiasts are in luck: Zumthor recently started renting out Unterhus, one of two vacation cabins he built on a mountainside in the tiny Swiss hamlet of Leis. The adjacent second house, the Oberhus, is Zumthor's own retreat where he lives with his wife, Annalisa, who grew up in the area and had long pined for a mountain home.

    His light, airy, narrow wooden structures are a modern take on the surrounding traditional architecture, the antithesis to one of Zumthor's most revered works, the Hotel Thermes Vals, located on the valley floor below and built from gray quartzite and concrete.

    N.B.: Zumthor has recently completed a third cabin nearby, Türmlihus, that's newly available for rent. For more information, go to Zumthor Ferien Haeuser.

    Photography by Hélène Binet.

    Above: Zumthor's cabins are sited on a snowy incline. There's great skiing—and hiking—directly from the doorsteps; click here for info on winter sports in the area.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: Large windows open up to panoramic views and extend almost the width of the house.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland with panoramic windows

    Above: The walls are made from tongue and groove pine boards.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: In the living room, a small low window with a sliding shutter reveals the view outside.

    Dining room in Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: Zumthor's work is minimalist but rich with detail, with great attention paid to the woodwork (his father was a cabinetmaker by trade).

    Bedroom in Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: A sliding panoramic window in the bedroom.

    Bathroom in architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: Wood detailing is present throughout the house, including the bathroom, which even has a wooden sink. Another small window can be seen in the far wall.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: An outdoor seating area on a stone terrace for dining al fresco in warmer weather. Zumthor supplies guests with backpacks, thermos flasks, binoculars, hiking sticks, a local map, and the Handbuch Schweizer Alpen with detailed information on Alpine flora and fauna and geology.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: The village of Leis has just 20 inhabitants, and at 5,125 feet above sea level, it's the highest hamlet in the Vals area that's inhabited all year round.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland with wood beam contruction

    Above: Zumthor used wood beam construction; the roof is clad in local granite slabs required by local building code. In lieu of a central beam, he used steel rods to pull together the wood-framed walls, leaving a space between the roof and the top of the house.

    Architect Peter Zumthor's Oberhus and Unterhus in Vals Switzerland

    Above: The houses, viewed from across the valley.

    If, like us, you can't get enough of Peter Zumthor, take a look at his book Thinking Architecture. The ultimate Swiss vacation? Combine a stay in one of Zumthor's cabins with a visit to Vals Thermal Spa, his monumental resort design.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on February 6, 2013 as part of our On the Mountain issue.


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    Discovered on The Common Pursuit: A rustic cabin in Echo Park worthy of Henry Thoreau (and available for $115 a night). Photographer Brian Ferry of The Blue Hour spent a week there and says: "I had my coffee in the morning on the porch, sent some emails or read at the table, and later in the day, watched the sunset from the back deck. Simply done, but really thoughtful and tasteful." To see the listing, go to Airbnb.

    Photographs by Brian Ferry

    Above: The kitchen includes a hot plate, refrigerator, electric kettle, and assorted teas and coffee.

    Above: A collection of vintage tableware.

    Above: Everything is within easy reach in the tiny cabin.

    Above: A table for two.

    Above: Vignettes.

    Above: There's a postage-stamp-size deck with seating.

    Above: The shower floor has Moroccan tiles.

    Above: Morning coffee on the deck.

    Heading to LA? Consult our City Guide for places to stay, shop, and eat. And go to Rental Houses for standout recommendations the world over.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 3, 2012, as part of our Cabins & Camping issue.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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      We've been longtime fans of High Road House, a London hotel and member's club (it's part of the Soho House group), so when we noticed that it had recently been overhauled by Alexander Waterworth Interiors we took note. Located on the site of the historic Fouberts Hotel in Chiswick, West London, High Road House opened in 2006 with a whitewashed, color-accented interior by Ilse Crawford. The team at Alexander Waterworth has taken it in a moodier direction, with a midcentury vibe and an art collection featuring works by London artists. 

      Club Bar

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: A seating area in the club bar; the mix of materials—black-and-white tiled floors, whitewashed brick fireplace, and polished pine floors—adds warmth to the high-ceilinged space.

      High Road House Lounge | Remodelista

      Above: A view into the club bar.

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: "The brass detailing adds a refined element to the design," according to the team at Alexander Waterworth.

      Club Rooms

      High Road House Soho House Lounge | Remodelista

      Above: The team sourced many of the midcentury pieces from Mar-Den, a London purveyor of twentieth century furniture.

      High Road House Lounge | Remodelista

      Above: On display: the High Road House art collection features works by Elizabeth Price, Ryan Gander, Mark Wallinger, and emerging British artists.

      High Road House Lounge | Remodelista

      Above: "Velvet upholstery and traditional rugs keep the atmosphere warm," according to the designers.

      High Road House Meeting Room | Remodelista

      Above: A private meeting room.

      Tiny Room

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: The tiniest rooms start at $250 a night and include an ensuite bath with shower; the Shaker peg rails provide ample storage opportunities.

      Small Room

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: Jielde reading lamps flank the bed.

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: A view into the tiled bath.

      High Road House Bedroom | Remodelista

      Above: A pair of yellow-upholstered lounge chairs add a dash of color to the space.

      The Playroom

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: The largest rooms feature freestanding bathtubs.

      High Road House Remodel | Remodelista

      Above: A seating area with midcentury pieces.

      High Road House London Redesign | Remodelista

      Above: A roll top bath and Cowshed toiletries.

      Below: High Road House, a combination hotel and member's club owned by the Soho House group, is located in West London. For booking information, go to High Road House.

      See High Road House in its original incarnation in our post Steal This Look: An Ilse Crawford-Designed Bedroom.

      Alexander Waterworth Interiors is a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory. Have a look at their work on a farm estate in Italy in our post Italian House Tour: Pastels Go Rustic.

      More Stories from Remodelista


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        One of the Loire Valley's great landmarks, the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, burial place of Richard the Lionhart and Eleanor of Aquitaine, has played many roles over the years, from monastery to prison. It's now a cultural center with a priory transformed into an ascetically luxurious new hotel and restaurant. 

        The conversion is the work of Canadian-born architect Sanit Manku and French designer Patrick Jouin of Jouin Manku. Their greatest challenge? They weren't permitted to touch the ceilings and walls of the UNESCO World Heritage site—"everything is built from chalky, white limestone, and when I say everything I mean everything," says Manku. Take a look at how they employed what they call "microarchitecture" and their own minimalist furniture to create a setting that gracefully celebrates past and present, simplicity and grandeur. Wool monk robes available for those who want the full-immersion experience.

        Photographs by Nicolas Mathéus.

          The lobby at L'Hotel Fontevraud, a new hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Fontevraud L'Hôtel is located in the abbey's Saint-Lazare priory. The lobby, with its minimalist oak-paneled desk amid original stonework, sets the hushed and hallowed tone that permeates throughout. The glass-and-metal front door borrows its geometric pattern from stained glass. "We quietly slipped into the Saint-Lazare priory, immersing ourselves in its history," write the designers. "We tried to capture its essence, from its monastic simplicity to its prison austerity. Then we had to fine-tune our approach to give life to a contemporary vision that would respect and preserve the spirit of the building. We don't want the visitor to forget where they are."

          The new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: A place for contemplation—and perhaps a cognac. The designers used alter-like freestanding black screens to create intimate spaces within the vast chapel, a meeting place intended as a combination bar and "digital mediatheque." They warmed the chilly space with furniture built from old beams, some of which have touchscreen tabletops and built-in tablets. There's also radiant heat flooring—and for further warmth, those monk robes hang nearby on wall hooks.

        A lobby detail at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: The simple benches and stools reference traditional ecclesiastical design. The standing screens are made of oak covered with a stretch-knit fabric by Innofa.

        A room at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: The 54 rooms are simple yet sybaritic. Located in three parts of the priory, each has its own shape defined by the existing architecture: Some are tall-ceilinged duplexes, others sloping attic rooms, and this one has its own arched window wall and entrance to the garden.

        A room at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: All of the furniture and accessories, down to the wastebaskets, were custom made for the project. Padded walls with built-in angled headrests help soundproof the rooms.

        Bedside detailing at L'Hotel Fontevraud at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

         Above: Discreet bedside lighting and detailing, including notebook holder—worth copying at home.

        Custom furniture in a room at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: Art, lighting, and coat hooks hang from steel rails that pay homage to what Manku terms "monk tech": "The monks didn't have a big budget, but they were incredibly crafty," he told the New York Times. "They wouldn't have six light sources in the same room. They'd have one and a little mirror that reflected the light. And the mirror would also be something you could hang your coat on. We said we need to do the same thing."

        Custom light at L'Hotel Fontevraud, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Modern-day torches, the steel hanging lights are designed to be easily portable.

        A guest bathoom at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: Guest rooms have shuttered windows and sinks with incorporated towel rails.

        Stair at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: Like all great abbeys, Fontevraud comes complete with winding stairs, which the designers illuminate with a contemporary light tree.

        Fontevraud Le Restaurant, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Fontevraud Le Restaurant is furnished much like the hotel—"inviting one to consider life's essentials," Manku says.

        Fontevraud Le Restaurant, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Herb-enhanced water in a beaker.

        Restaurant at the new Fontevraud L'Hotel in the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey, Loire Valley, France | Remodelista

        Above: Padded seating and monumental lighting lend the dining room comfort and drama (and good acoustics).

        Fontevraud Le Restaurant, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: A modern monastic dining experience—with 130 LED candles running down its center. When it was an abbey, Manku explained to the New York Times, "you'd go in as an individual and become part of the community. We're trying to do subtle things to get people to understand a little bit of what it was like to live here." Extra folding chairs hang from church-style stalls (which also hide heating and lighting elements and Wi-Fi terminals) along the perimeter of the banquet hall.

        Fontevraud Le Restaurant, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Throughout, the designers adhered to a palette of pale, natural colors, which extends to the soft blue, glazed stoneware made by ceramicist Charles Hair, whose workshop is near the abbey. The bread plates double as covers for the bowls. 

        Fontevraud Le Restaurant, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Above: Italian-made beechwood and leather seating designed by Patrick Jouin in the cloister.

        A work area at L'Hotel Fontevraud, newly opened at the 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista 

        Above: There are plenty of tranquil places to get down to work at Fontevraud.

        Fontevraud Abbey a Unesco World Heritage site in France's Loire Valley with a new hotel and restaurant | Remodelista

        Above: Manicured gardens and an apple orchard surround Fontevraud, which was founded in 1101 by iconoclastic preacher Robert d'Abrissel, who welcomed men and women to his monastic community—36 abbesses went on to run the abbey. In the 19th century, Napoleon had Fontevraud converted to a prison, inadvertently saving it from destruction.

        Fontevraud Abbey a Unesco World Heritage site in France's Loire Valley with a new hotel and restaurant | Remodelista

        Above: The hotel's courtyard surrounds an 18th-century physic garden devoted to the cultivation of medicinal plants.

        The 12th-century Fontevraud Abbey in France's Loire Valley | Remodelista

        Fontevraud Abbey is located in the heart of the Loire Valley, between Touraine and Anjou. For more details and reservations, go to Fontevraud L'Hôtel and Fontevraud Le Restaurant, and for visitor information, see Fontevraud.

        Looking for a getaway? See our Hotel & Lodging recommendations around the world, and for something closer to home, consider New York's Gothic High Line Hotel, designed by Roman & Williams and located in a former seminary.

        More Stories from Remodelista


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          A first in a city packed with corporate chain hotels, The Dean, in Providence, Rhode Island, is an Ace-inspired gathering place with a playful vibe and a flair for applying a fresh spin to old New England design. 

          The hotel was created with the hope of becoming a local point of pride: Most of the furnishings and accoutrements are the work of designers and artists in and around Providence. The fact that it was developed by New York real estate and interior design firm ASH NYC might be damning—except that ASH founder and CEO Ari Heckman is a Providence native and cheerleader.

          The Dean's interiors are the perfect draw for parents of students at Rhode Island School of Design and Brown University, but the hotel is also young and ready for fun: a coffee bar and Hofbräuhaus-style restaurant are the tamer of the four in-house establishments; a karaoke bar and seductively decorated cocktail lounge are the more risqué. And waiting in the lobby for those ready to explore Providence is an army of fixed-gear bikes.

          Photography via The Dean.

          Lounge with Original Vintage Tile, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: The Dean is set in a 1912 brick building, originally an Episcopalian social services center, and later a brothel turned strip club. The lobby displays the original tiled floor, which was uncovered during the renovation.

          Italian Style Coffee Bar at The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: The lobby also hosts a cafe modeled on traditional Italian stand-up espresso bars. 

          Above: A bench-seating table at Faust, The Dean's Bavarian restaurant.

          Bedroom with Black Barn Door in The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Furniture in the 52 guest rooms is a mix of custom-designed and vintage pieces. Developer Ari Heckman told Sleeper magazine, "We asked ourselves if we could use local artisans for everything, and it turns out it was actually more affordable to do so."

          The light fixtures are by Will Cooper, creative director at ASH NYC. They're the first products in ASH's soon-to-launch furnishings line.

          Portrait and Furniture, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: The top-floor suite has four connected rooms and sleeps up to 10. 

          Bathroom with Shower in Glass Wall and Black Door, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: A revealing shower in a double room is described as "ideal for voyeurs and exhibitionists." 

          Antique European Portrait, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Artwork is a mix of vintage European portraits found in Paris and contemporary photography by RISD students and alums.

          Vintage Persian or Kilim Rug, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Classic rugs—some Persian, some Turkish—add color to otherwise neutral rooms. 

          Vintage Bench and Hangers, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Instead of closets and dressers, rooms are kitted out with simple hanging hardware. (Pack lightly.)

          Chairs in an Open Plan Bathroom of The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Another staple absent from guest rooms? Phones. The hotel's general manager told the Providence Journal, "We find that passé; everyone has a cell phone these days." 

          Black and White Bathroom with Brass Fixtures, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Bathrooms are in black and white with brass hardware. The mirrors were designed by ASH's Cooper and Heckman.

          Brahms Mount Blanket at The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Beds have linens by Matouk of nearby Fall River, Massachusetts, and custom-woven blankets by Brahms Mount of Maine, both longtime Remodelista favorites.

          Bunk Beds at Night, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Bunkbeds, anyone? The Dean's blackened steel bed frames and desks are by Providence artist Nate Nadeau.  

          Glamorous Red and Black Bath, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: A bathroom off the Magdalenae Room, "an intimate and discreet" cocktail lounge modeled after European hotel bars. 

          Pink Walls and Crystal Chandelier, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Pink walls and overtly romantic lighting nod to the building's past.

          Pink Paint and Lobby Sign, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Basic needs—plus karaoke. 

          Exterior Brick Renovated Facade, The Dean Hotel in Providence, Rhode Island | Remodelista

          Above: Kite Architects of Providence restored the building's original architecture, including the facade. For more information and reservations, see The Dean.

          Swear off dull hotels, once and for all. Try:

          More Stories from Remodelista


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            It's an unlikely love story. High-flying, edge-loving Swiss art dealers Iwan Wirth and Manuela Hauser of Hauser & Wirth (they have contemporary art galleries in London, New York City, Zurich, and Los Angeles) fell for the ancient, King Arthur–esque landscape of Somerset, England, a while back, and moved there full time with their four children. This past summer, they opened an ambitious arts center with a gallery, artists residencies, a bookshop, a learning room, a restaurant, a farm shop, and a 1.5-acre perennial meadow by Dutch master garden designer Piet Oudolf. The centerpiece? Durslade Farmhouse, a six-bedroom historic structure restored in a completely idiosyncratic fashion and available for rent. Join us for a tour.

            Photography by Aaron Schuman and Dominic Brown via Durslade Farmhouse.

            Durslade Farmhouse in Somerset | Remodelista

            Above: Paris architectural firm Laplace & Co. and conservation specialists Benjamin + Beauchamp oversaw the renovation of the 200-year-old farmhouse. The facade features a neon installation by British conceptual artist Martin Creed.

            Durslade Sitting Room in Somerset | Remodelista

            Above: In the sitting room, a wall is papered in Sanderson toile de Jouy.

            Durslade Farmhouse in Somerset | Remodelista

            Above: Another view of the sitting room. The house is filled with work by Hauser & Worth artists.

            Durslade Farmhouse Kitchen | Remodelista

            Above: The kitchen is anchored by a Smeg range tucked into the hearth.

            Durslade Farmhouse in Somerset, England | Remodelista

            Above: A detail of a kitchen shelf.

            Durslade Farmhouse Kitchen | Remodelista

            Above: The kitchen features traditional amenities, including a farmhouse sink. The vintage plates on the wall reference Bruton, the town in Somerset where the house is located.

            Durslade Farmhouse Kitchen | Remodelista

            Above: The designers stripped back layers of paint and paper to reveal the original surfaces.

            Durslade Farmhouse Dining Room | Remodelista

            Above: Buenos Aires artist Guillermo Kuitca painted the dining room mural during a five-week summer residency at Durslade. "I had no previous image or script in mind," he says.

            Durslade Farmhouse Dining Room | Remodelista

            Above: Kuitca also selected the chairs, tablecloth, plates, and glasses: "I feel as though there is a religious, almost austere quality to the room and wanted to retain this feeling," he says.

            Durslade Farmhouse Bedroom in Somerset | Remodelista

            Above: A view from one of the bedrooms into the dining room.

            Durslade Farmhouse in Somerset | Remodelista

            Above: Bedroom Three on the first floor features a patchwork floor and views of the dovecote.

            Durslade Farmhouse Bedroom Green Floor | Remodelista

            Above: A settee upholstered in a traditional English print.

            Durslade Farmhouse in Somerset, England | Remodelista

            Above: A mix of vintage furniture animates the space.

            Durslade Farmhouse Bedroom with Hangers | Remodelista

            Above: Old-fashioned wood hangers on brass hooks.

            Durslade Farmhouse Bedroom | Remodelista

            Above: A wall is papered in a design by Paul McCarthy in Bedroom Five.

            Durslade Farmhouse Attic Bedroom | Remodelista

            Above: Bedroom Six has a white-painted floor and views of the countryside.

            Durslade Farmhouse Attic Bedroom | Remodelista

            Above: A detail shot of the bathroom, with a privacy screen.

            Durslade Farmhouse Bath | Remodelista

            Above: A bath with a view.

            Durslade Farmhouse Attic Bedroom | Remodelista

            Above: The bed is tucked under the eaves.

            Durslade Farmhouse Exterior | Remodelista

            Above: Consisting of a group of outbuildings dating to the mid-1700s, the compound includes a threshing barn, stables, cowsheds, an engine house, a giant stainless steel dairy pail sculpture by Subodh Gupta, and more.

            Piet Oudorf Meadow Durslade | Remodelista

            Above: A meadow designed by Piet Oudolf, the Genius Behind New York's High Line. (See more of his work in Gardenista's Steal This Look: Piet Oudolf's Private Garden and Garden Visit: Piet Oudolf in Yorkshire.)

            Below: The center is located in Bruton, Somerset, approximately 2 1/2 hours by car from London (train service also available). Go to Hauser & Wirth Somerset to see the full setup. To inquire about rental details, go to Durslade Farmhouse.

            Planning a trip? Go to Hotels & Lodgings for our favorite places to stay all over the world, and consult our UK Travel Guide for restaurants, shops, house rentals, and more.

            More Stories from Remodelista


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              Zoie Kingsbery Coe, founder of vacation rental site Kid & Coe, traveled the world with her deejay husband, managing his career (first as a couple, then with two kids in tow). Out of necessity, she began compiling a list of rental houses all over that welcome kids; when her friends entreated her to share her list, Kid & Coe was born.

              Little more than a year later, the New York–based company offers family vacationers sophisticated, kid-friendly rentals on six continents (no Antarctica, yet). We browsed the site and found inspired kids' decor worldwide.

              Amsterdam

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The Wouwermanstraat residence in Amsterdam offers two double bedrooms and two kids' rooms in an early-1900s building. Its three floors are outfitted in Scandi-style whites and grays; €475 to €500 (about $590 to $620) per night.

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: Amsterdam's Keizersgracht is on the third and fourth floors of a renovated canal house, within walking distance of the Anne Frank House and an organic farmer's market. The living room sports a hot pink sofa and the kitchen comes with Philippe Starck Louis Ghost chairs; €275 to €300 (about $340 to $370) per night.

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The Brahmsstraat home in Amsterdam occupies the ground floor and lower level of an apartment building with a large backyard garden. Charming modern furnishings include a tepee in one of the kids' rooms and a light-filled, brick-walled kitchen; €250 (about $310) per night.

              Barcelona

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: Barcelona's Diputació residence is a circa-1900s flat with one adult room and two kids' rooms. It's within walking distance of the city's central attractions and bicycle distance of the beach and zoo; €150 (about $186) per night.

              Berlin

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The Ballenstedter home in Berlin can accommodate a small family in one large room with a double bed, a kids' bed, and a crib on the third floor of an apartment building. Sightseeing is nearby, as are local parks and a playground behind the building; €70 (about $87) per night.

              Lisbon

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The cheery Rua Bombard residence in Lisbon is decorated with artifacts from the owners' travels. The nursery has twin cribs, plus a play table and plenty of toys. A child-safe terrace overlooks Lisbon's rooftops and river; €80 to €90 (about $100 to $112) per night.

              New York

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: In New York's Hudson Valley, the 1930s residence sleeps five and has a playroom, covered front porch, and sprawling yard with a tire swing, baby swing, and hammock. Older kids can explore swimming holes nearby; $300 per night.

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: This West 11th Street residence in New York City is located in the West Village near parks and playgrounds (one kids' room has a double bed and the other has bunk beds). Renters are free to use the on-site skateboards, scooters, and helmets; $750 to $850 per night.

              Paris

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The Faubourg apartment in Paris is on two floors with high ceilings and sleeps two adults and two children (there's also an extra crib). Kids can play in the playroom and private courtyard; the Centre Pompidou is a 20-minute walk away; €200 to €250 (about $250 to $310) per night.

              Sydney

              Kid & Coe Vacation Rentals for Families with Kids | Remodelista

              Above: The Cambridge Street house in the Paddington area of Sydney has three bedrooms, a nursery, a small private terrace, and a shaded deck with a play area; $500 per night.

              Ready for a vacation? Go to our Rental Houses posts for more ideas, including:

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                If you ask me, Barcelona is one of the best cities in the world, but as a part-time resident, I'm admittedly biased. Like Sydney and Cape Town, Barcelona is a city by the beach with a laid-back attitude and big-time cultural attractions. Beyond the familiar draws—the works of Antoni Gaudì, late-night tapas, chiringuitos (beach clubs), boutique hotels—there's so much more to be discovered design-wise. Here are some of my favorites that have yet to make it into the guidebooks.

                Photography by Pauline Egge

                Best Menu del Dia

                Lando in Barcelona, Spain, Photograph by Pauline Egge of Petite Passport | Remodelista

                Above: A few friends opened Lando in a former garage, converting it into a bright, glittering restaurant with hanging pendant bulbs and exposed ventilation along the ceiling. Located in hipster district Sant Antoni, the canteen serves up an ever-changing, three-course menu, while the bar offers light tapas in a stylish setting. Photograph via Lando on Petite Passport.

                Best Family Stay

                Yök Casa Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, Photograph by Pauline Egge of Petite Passport | Remodelista

                Above: Yök Casa + Cultura is the creation of Petz Scholtus and Mari Rodríguez Marañís, who transformed a floor in a typical Barcelona residential building into three eco-friendly apartments available for short-term rent. Two of the setups sleep four each; the third has room for eight—perfect for a family or group of friends on vacation. Yök Casa is just on the edge of El Born, a popular district full of slim alleyways and winding streets. Photograph via Yök Casa on Petite Passport.

                A Hotel and Bakery in One

                Praktik Bakery Hotel in Barcelona, Spain, Photograph by Pauline Egge of Petite Passport | Remodelista

                Above: Currently there are five Praktik Hotels in Spain: one in Madrid and four in Barcelona, each with its own theme. The most recently opened, Praktik Vinoteca, as the name suggests is all about wine, while Praktik Garden is designed with plenty of houseplants. Interior designer Lázaro Rosa Violán is responsible for all the hotels. My favorite is Praktik Bakery, where the ground floor of the hotel features a large bakery open to guests and anyone walking in off the street. A bonus: Praktik Bakery is situated near La Pedrera, one of Gaudí's famous works, and close to Vinçon, the popular interiors shop, so you can plan a morning or afternoon around a pilgrimage to all three. Photograph via Praktik Bakery on Petite Passport.

                Favorite Spot for Afternoon Tea

                Artte in Barcelona, Spain, Photograph by Pauline Egge of Petite Passport | Remodelista

                Above: A cultural space designed by Lázaro Rosa Violán (of the aforementioned Praktik Hotels), Artte is filled with shops and restaurants. lt's located in a former parking garage and the only natural light filters through the roof and the entrance. Head to the middle to find one of my favorite tea shops for buying bagged and loose tea, and plan to sit for a cup while you're there. Photograph via Artte on Petite Passport.

                Where to Go for a Leisurely Dinner

                Niño Viejo Restaurant in Barcelona, Spain, Photograph by Pauline Egge of Petite Passport | Remodelista

                Above: Albert Adrià, brother of Ferran Adrià of El Bulli fame, opened Niño Viejo in August with chef Paco Méndez. The homey-industrial interior is the work of Pilar Líbano, who commissioned a former Disney cartoonist to draw illustrations on a few of the walls. The menu is new-style Mexican taqueria (I recommend the ceviche with cactus). Photograph via Niño Viejo on Petite Passport.

                Our new Weekend Guide columnist, Pauline Egge, is the founder and editor of the travel site Petite Passport. Pauline lives in Barcelona and the Netherlands, and spends much of her time crisscrossing the globe. For Remodelista, she'll be sharing her favorite design addresses, city by city.

                For more places to eat, drink, and sleep, see our Spain City Guides.

                Read Pauline Egge's guide to one of the World's Great Coffee Capitals.

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                  Here's a novel concept: an übermodern Scandi hotel whose proprietors are so fixated on reconnecting guests with nature that they lament having to charge a fee. (But, yes, you still have to pay for it.)

                  Located in a forest outside of Alesund, Norway, the Juvet Landscape Hotel is sited on a gorge of the river Valldøla. (Juvet means "gorge" in Norwegian.) Owner Knut Slinning is a local, and his earnest desire to help people experience the natural beauty of his region is admirable: “I would love our guests to have a feeling that this is a fantastic place, that they had been visiting friends, and that they had a very, very nice time. And that I am sorry that they had to pay for it.”

                  Slinning commissioned Oslo architects Jensen & Skodvin to design seven small cabins, each with at least one entire wall made of glass. The results are minimal cubes of wood and concrete whose interiors are dark and truly spare; the structures are designed to focus guests solely on the outdoors while inside. Each cabin's massive glass wall frames a view of the forest and river gorge, unobstructed by so much as a curtain.

                  One interesting note: The hotel's design was aided in part by a Norwegian public works project investing in rural infrastructure. The project had a rule that developments were barred from copying ancestral Norwegian architecture, with the aim of demonstrating ingenuity in engineering and design as a hallmark of modern Norway.

                  For booking information, visit Juvet Landscape Hotel.

                  Minimalist wood and glass architecture hotel in Norway in forest in winter

                  Above: With the ethic of being a guest in nature, the hotel's cabins are built on stilts; when they've finished living their useful lives, they can easily be removed.

                  Modern minimalist wood architecture in hotel in Norway in winter forest

                  Above: A porthole window in one of the cabin bathrooms offers its own unique view. The hotel spa sits so close to the gorge that guests are meant to "feel" the spray from the river during treatments.

                  Modern minimalist red and concrete glass box with view of snow in Norway

                  Above: All view rooms, such as the hotel sauna, are intended to give the impression of being inside a camera.

                  Modern minimalist concrete bathroom with blue color accent in Norway

                  Above: Occasional walls of bold color break concrete monotony in the spa. There are no curtains in the stark bedrooms and the natural light is bright in summer months. The hotel owners considered adding drapes, but guests urged them not to, saying that waking in the cabins is like waking outdoors.

                  Yellow concrete and wood modern minimalist bathroom in hotel in Norway

                  Above: Bathrooms are among the few rooms with color. The cabins were first planned without bathrooms or showers to emphasize simplicity in nature, but in the end a few modern comforts were added.

                  Modern minimalist glass architecture floor to ceiling glass in hotel in Norway with winter views

                  Above: Walking into a cabin is meant to be a dramatic experience, as if nature is rushing in through the massive panoramic windows to greet you.

                  Juvet Landscape Hotel in Winter in Snow Cabins in Norway Modern Minimalist

                  Above: The hotel owners didn't want the architecture to stand in the way of guests' experience of nature; they in fact want guests to realize that life in Norway has been a struggle for survival.

                  Keep planning your Norwegian stay: 

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                    Winter in Madrid is very inviting: When I was there over the holidays, the sky was blue, the sun was shining, and it was in the sixties some days. One of the most happening areas to explore is the Las Salesas district. Just north of the well-known Chueca neighborhood, it's home to a new crop of design-oriented restaurants, shops, and hotels. Let me take you to five not to miss.

                    Photography by Pauline Egge.

                    Best Design Spot 

                    Do Design, a concept store in Madrid via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                    Above: Definitely the most beautiful concept store in Spain, Do Design showcases art, fashion, and housewares in an airy space with a front counter set inside a wooden house and dressing rooms that look like striped beach cabanas. It also has a small cafe where you can drink coffee, take in a print show, and meet some of the most creative people in Madrid. Photograph via Do Design on Petite Passport

                    Best Restaurant 

                      The Table By, a pop-up restaurant in Madrid, via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                    Above: The Table By is a cool new pop-up restaurant in a grand 19th-century neoclassical building that was recently converted into the luxurious Hotel Urso. Every month, a different star Spanish chef presents the signature dishes of his or her restaurant. Through January 30, it's Fernando Canales of Etxanobe in Bilbao. The place is popular: Be sure to make a reservation. Photograph via The Table By on Petite Passport. 

                    Best Breakfast Spot 

                    Dray Martina in Madrid via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                    Above: Whenever I go to Dray Martina, I find it hard to leave. They serve a good breakfast at the counter (I get the yogurt with granola, fruit, and honey), and the all-white space with its amber globe lights is equally a draw. And to keep customers lingering, there’s a reading table stocked with the latest magazines. Photograph via Dray Martina on Petite Passport.

                    Best Fashion Store 

                    Pez in Madrid via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                    Above: Across the street from Do Design is Pez, a spacious store that sells women's fashion brands such as Humanoid, American Vintage, and IRO. I recommend the fluor sneakers by Golden Goose. In the basement, Pez offers things for the home, and Pez also has a superb menswear store just down the street. Photograph via Pez on Petite Passport.

                    Best Hotel

                    Only You Hotel in Madrid via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                    Above: The glam Only You Hotel & Lounge is the work of Spanish designer Lázaro Rosa-Violán. I like the check-in area the most: Old white suitcases are piled in a wall behind the desk, and the elevators are surrounded by blue-and-white Chinese tiles. Photograph via Only You Hotel & Lounge on Petite Passport.

                    Our new Weekend Guide columnist, Pauline Egge, is the founder and editor of the travel site Petite Passport. Pauline lives in Barcelona and the Netherlands and spends much of her time crisscrossing the globe. For Remodelista, she'll be sharing her favorite design addresses, city by city. Have a look at her recent guides.

                    Go to our Design Travel posts for more.

                     

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                      There's a lot of great design percolating in Amsterdam—and that extends to the city's guesthouses. Today, we're shining a light on five places to stay.

                      Photography by Pauline Egge.

                      A Design-Filled Duplex

                      &Klevering a shop in Amsterdam via Petite Passport | Remodelista  

                      &Klevering is a well-curated housewares shop, and its owners recently opened their duplex apartment as a guest rental. Of course, it's decorated with things from &Klevering—but there's more than that to see: The living room overlooks a quiet canal. Photographs via &Klevering on Petite Passport 

                      Surrounded by Dutch Design 

                      Hotel Droog in Amsterdam via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                      Droog Design, the edgy design brand from the Netherlands, has its own cultural center in a 17th-century building in the center of Amsterdam. At Hôtel Droog, you can shop (for Droog and other designs), have lunch, see an exhibition, and explore a garden. For the full experience, you can also book the hotel's lone room, a charmingly furnished top-floor suite, living room, kitchen, and bathroom with black fixtures. Photographs via Hôtel Droog on Petite Passport.

                      In a Former Brewery 

                      Stout & Co. in Amsterdam via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                      Above: Stout & Co. is a B&B located in what was once one of the city's most popular breweries. Its architect owners completely rebuilt the structure and opened a few luxurious rental apartments above their office on the ground floor. Each has its own bedroom, living room, kitchen, and bath—and I can promise you that you'll never want to check out. Sunday through Thursday the rate is €147 ($173) per room per night; Friday and Saturday it's €167 ($196). Photographs via Stout & Co. on Petite Passport.

                      Under the Beams

                      Hotel Dwars in Amsterdam via Petite Passport | Remodelista

                      Above: Utrechtsestraat is a street full of places to discover, such as Marqt (a high-style "biological supermarket"), SLA (a hip salad bar), and Pistache (a pop-up event venue). Hotel Dwars is situated on a side street, Utrechtsedwarsstraat, and was once a hostel. The new young owners devoted a year and a half to turning the place into a nine-room style hotel—they worked on the design with stylists Things I Like Things I Love. The room to request is No. 9, shown here, where you get to sleep under the rafters while looking out over Amsterdam rooftops. Photographs via Hotel Dwars on Petite Passport.

                      In Amsterdam Noord

                        Sweet Dreams Amsterdam | Remodelista

                      Above: Have you heard of Hotel de Goudfazant? If you're heading to Amsterdam, this Dutch-French restaurant is a must. It’s located in Amsterdam Noord (take the ferry to get there), where the Goudfazant's owners have also opened a new place called Cafe Modern. And the good news is that you can sleep above the cafe in their B&B, Sweet Dreamz, which they bill as "three rooms, six bikes, four showers." Each room is the work of a different Dutch design duo and their names are in marker on the doors: there's the Kiki & Joost room, the Maarten & Bas room, and the Herman & Tania room (shown here). Photographs via Style Memories.

                      Our new Weekend Guide columnist, Pauline Egge, is the founder and editor of the travel site Petite Passport. Pauline lives in Barcelona and the Netherlands, and spends much of her time crisscrossing the globe. For Remodelista, she'll be sharing her favorite design addresses, city by city.

                      Have a look at her guides to:

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                        Paradise within reach? A new wave of restored villas for rent is making it possible; here's our guide to the farmhouse rental, Italian style. N.B. A good source for villa rentals is The Thinking Traveller.

                        Masseria Alchimia in Puglia | Remodelista

                        Above: Masseria Alchimia is a restored, high-style masseria with 10 studios for rent; watch the snazzy video here.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: The perks at Masseria Cimino near Brindisi? A restaurant, a swimming pool, bicycles for guest use, plus olive oil made on the property. The 18th-century farmhouse was constructed from stone salvaged from a nearby Roman archaeological site. Rates start at $210 per night at Great Small Hotels

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: Located in the town of Cisternino in Puglia, this Airbnb rental ($418 per night) is not a masseria but a collection of trulli—19th-century conical stone huts used as agricultural housing and now protected as UNESCO World Heritage sites. This one features five bedrooms with three baths and two kitchens, and is surrounded by a garden, pool, and solarium. We give it extra points for an effort at environmental sustainability. 

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: A lovely 17th-century masseria in Petrarolo, Puglia, will be offered for rent sometime this year; stay tuned for details. The eight-bedroom estate flaunts romantic decor by Alexander Waterworth Interiors, as featured in House Tour: Pastels Go Rustic in an Italian Farmhouse. Photograph by Emily Andrews.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: Masseria Otranto in Otranto, Puglia, sleeps 11 people in three buildings: a main villa, a stone trullo, and a detached annex. Stylish interiors and swimming pool aside, it's a 10-minute drive to the local beach. Rates start at $8,600 per week at Masseria Otranto.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: A 16th-century masseria on a vineyard in the town of Grottaglie in Puglia sleeps 12 people in six bedrooms with eight baths and a private pool and garden. Rentals start at $775 per night for a minimum one-week stay on Airbnb.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: Casa Del Vento is a former monastery on Pantelleria, an island off the coast of Sicily. Located inside a national park, it features a pool, views, and outdoor lounge areas: hammocks, sofas, and chaise longues abound. For rental information, contact Casa Del Vento.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: Located in the Marche region, a high-style farmhouse with original stone walls is outfitted with furniture from Vitra, Cassina, and Philippe Stark. It sleeps 11 people with five baths, an infinity pool, and 360-degree hillside views. Rentals start at $5,060 per week at Casa Olivi.

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: Villa Pizzorusso, a formerly decaying masseria outside of Bari in Puglia, has six bedrooms, a swimming pool, and an orange grove, and sleeps up to 14 people. Shown here, a dining table seats 16 in the masseria's former stables. For more of the estate's eclectic furnishings, see For Rent: A Revived 16th-Century Farmhouse in Puglia. Rentals start at $5,600 per week at Villa Pizzorusso

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: The Mazzini residence is located on the border of Umbria and Tuscany in the 11th-century village of Monteleone, perfectly situated for family day trips to Rome and Florence. The 18th-century home sleeps nine people in three bedrooms, sports an indoor pool, and welcomes kids. Here, original stone walls surround a modern eat-in kitchen. Rentals start at $425 per night at Kid & Coe

                        Masseria and Farmhouse Vacation Rentals in Italy | Remodelista

                        Above: This masseria in Muro Leccese in Puglia has a vast collection of modern artwork and an orange garden on a sprawling property. The main building sleeps 14 people in six bedrooms, but arrangements can be made for an additional 19 people on adjoining properties. Rentals start at $1,193 per night for a minimum of two nights on Airbnb

                        For more rentals around the world, see:

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                          Tradition meets state-of-the-art hospitality at the Talbot Inn in Somerset: fish-and-chips, venison stew, and ale on tap, plus Egyptian cotton sheets, handmade soap, and Siberian goose down duvets. A venture of hotelier Nick Jones of Soho House fame, The Talbot is located in the village of Mells in Somerset, two hours from London by train. Once a traditional coaching inn for horse-powered travelers, it's now a gastronomic destination with two restaurants and eight bedrooms for overnight guests. 

                          The inn earned a 2015 Bib Gourmand award, which Michelin presents to restaurants offering exceptional food at modest prices. The pub serves top-notch versions of English staples such as savory pies and beer from local breweries Butcombe and Keystone in addition to its own Talbot Ale. The grill room, open on weekends, serves fish and meat cooked simply over fire—“the way country inns cooked hundreds of years ago." 

                          The best part? The Talbot's moderate prices: Rooms start at £95 ($143.47) year-round, hearty breakfast included. For more information, visit the Talbot Inn

                          Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: The Talbot is down to earth (despite the fact that it hosted the Rolling Stones' entourage for a concert two autumns ago); village locals and overnight guests are equally welcome, and no weddings are allowed—they're too disruptive to the everyday ebb and flow.  

                          The Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: What is now the inn's sitting room was a "tythe barn"—storage for regional agricultural taxes—500 years ago. The wall mural depicts the history of Mells—from Neolithic tombs to medieval castles to the country homes of architect Edward Lutyens. One part shows fairy tale characters including Little Jack Horner—purportedly the ancestor of Mells's notable Horner family—who according to legend plucked out the title to Mells Manor from a pie intended for Henry VIII.  

                          The Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: Each of the inn's eight bedrooms has Egyptian cotton sheets, Siberian goose down duvets, and vintage Welsh blankets. Artwork in the bedrooms and hallways is by local Mells artists. 

                          Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: Small luxuries include sheepskin rugs and comfy chairs in the bath.

                          The Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: Floors are covered in aromatic seagrass matting.

                          Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: Soaking tubs and wool-covered water bottles. 

                          The Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: The Talbot produces its own line of handmade, all-natural bath products called Bramley, available for purchase online. 

                          The Talbot Inn in Somerset | Remodelista

                          Above: Behind the pub, a cobblestone courtyard sports cafe tables and even umbrellas for the occasional sunny day in Somerset. Guests and locals alike can play pétanque on the nearby court.

                          Planning a trip to the UK? See:

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                            Johan Bouman and Pieter Franssens, the Dutch owners of Château de la Resle, describe it as "one of those typical countryside estates you see when driving in France that make you want to stop and discover what's inside." This one—after a decadelong renovation and influx of Dutch design—is now a hotel that stands ready for inspection.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Located in the Burgundy town of Montigny-la-Resle, Château de la Resle dates back to the 17th century (with more recent 19th-century parts) and has "seen a long series of aristocracy passing through," says Bouman. He and Franssens bought the estate from a Parisian family who used it for 50 years as a vacation place. 

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: "No permanent occupation since the Second World War and the last renovation dating to the sixties—you can imagine the amount of work," says Bouman, who owns a food company in Holland and originally came to France to open a subsidiary. "Bit by bit over the last ten years, we renovated everything: roofs, heating, electricity, bathrooms, kitchens, everything. And we added a restaurant, spa, and pool."

                            The first-floor hall, shown here, leads to three of the guest rooms; there are a total of six, including four suites, no two alike.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Shades of gray and mauve in Chablis, one of the rooms off the main hall. "We made all the plans for the renovation and the decoration ourselves," says Bouman. "We come from creative backgrounds and have been collecting art and design for years."

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Noyers, the château's family suite—with its own living room and kitchen—is situated in a 19th-century farm building on the grounds. The beams, Bouman reports, are original: "The roof structure was in perfect condition and we only dusted it off—surprising as the rest was in a terrible state." 

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel bathroom in Burgundy with Agape fittings | Remodelista

                            Above: The bathroom in Vezelay, the other suite in the farm building, is outfitted with Patricia Urquiola's Vieques Tub and Sinks made by Agape.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Built by a craftsman in Venice, a spiral stair in the Vezelay suite connects the downstairs living area to the bedroom.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Over the course of gathering and commissioning furnishings for the hotel, Bouman and Franssens found themselves with a gallery's worth of contemporary Dutch design and decided to launch their own Château de la Resle Design Shop. Favorite pieces are put to use throughout the hotel, including chairs by Christien Meindertsma and a Hendrik Kerstens photograph at the breakfast table. 

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel kitchen in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Table d'hôtes, the château's restaurant, features a custom kitchen in oak and "powder-coated construction beams" designed by Roderick Vos.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: The restaurant includes a chef's table and sitting area.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel Table d'Hotes in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: The kitchen opens to the pool area.

                            Candelabra at Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: Roderick Vos's Chablis Candelabra & Bottle is one of the designs launched by Château de la Resle. Shown here in black powder-coated aluminum, it's also available in a copper finish (see below). The Chablis Candelabra fits on any wine bottle.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel and design store sideboard,  Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: On display in the lobby design shop, Roderick Vos's Dresser Montigny is inspired by the bespoke kitchen cabinetry he created for the hotel. The chopping boards in Beechwood and Walnut are also special editions for Château de la Resle.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                            Above: The pool is surrounded by a wooden deck. There's also a gym, sauna, and massage room.

                            Chateau de la Resle hotel in Burgundy, France | Remodelista

                             Above: For more information, go to Château de al Resle.

                            Planning a trip? Take a look at our Travel Guide to France.

                            Remodelista subscribe | Remodelista

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                              Graphic designer David Rager lived in Paris for several years with his wife, Cherie Messerli (together they designed several up-to-the-minute Parisian restaurants like Candeliaria, Glass, and Le Mary Celeste, to name a few), before moving back to LA recently. We asked him for a "stream of consciousness" tour of his favorite Parisian haunts. Here's his list of 11 don't-miss cafes, restaurants, and wine bars. 

                              Vivant Restaurant in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "When we lived in the 9th arrondissement, Vivant (and later Vivant Cave) brightened the neighborhood. Vivant is housed in a former bird shop with the original beautiful walls still in place." Photograph via David Lebovitz.

                              Heimat Restaurant Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Heimat is a new restaurant from Pierre Jancou (former owner of Vivant). It's located near the Palais Royale in the same building where Molière lived and died." Photograph via Simon Says. Verjus Wine Bar in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Down the block is Verjus, which is always great. The wine bar on the ground floor is a good spot to pop in for a drink and a snack, and it's the only place in Paris where you'll find amazing fried chicken." Photograph via Verjus.

                              Restaurant Au Tour d'Un Verre in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Also in the 9th is Autour d'un Verre, which was our favorite local hangout (solid home-cooked French food and an incredible natural wine list) and La Pointe du Grouin, which uses its own currency (we call it Grouin coins) and serves very reasonably priced meals and magnums of wine. It's amazingly insane." Photograph by Vin & Chere.

                              Chez Janou in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "When we moved to the Place des Vosges, our go-to spot was Chez Janou, which is a good mix of tourists and locals. It's the kind of spot every neighborhood needs, open seven days a week (a rarity in Paris). The atmosphere is lively, the ratatouille is great, and the pastis menu is huge." Photograph via Monsieur Marcel.

                              Bones Restaurant in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "James Henry's restaurant Bones is another spot we'd find ourselves at quite often. You can sit at the bar and order from the bar menu, which includes great wine and beer. Or you can plan in advance for one of the two seatings they do every night; the food can get quite adventurous." Photographh via the NY Times.

                              Grazie Paris Restaurant | Remodelista

                              Above: "When we wanted something easy, we'd go to Grazie for a pizza and an Aperol spritz, or to Breizh Cafe for a crepe and cider." Photographs of Grazie, shown here, via Garance Dore.

                              Le Repaire de Cartouche in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Prior to Bones, James was at Au Passage, which is still great and is around the corner from Le Repaire de Cartouche (shown above), which recently converted their downstairs into a wine bar with a nice little menu." 

                              Camille's La Buvette in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Camille Fourmont's La Buvette on Rue Saint Maur is also a really cute/fun place to stop by for an apero, natural wines, and great small plates." Photographs via La Buvette. Le Servin Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "Nearby, at Le Servan, a former tabac/PMU turned into a restaurant, I had one of my favorite meals of 2014."

                              Yard Restaurant in Paris | Remodelista

                              Above: "And finally, Yard Restaurant, located in a former construction yard, is always a great time." Photograph via Yard. Alexa dropped in on David and his wife, Cheri at their Paris apartment a couple of years ago; see her post Californians in Paris: David Rager and Cheri Messerli.

                              Travel with us: Go to our City Guides for our favorite hotels, shops, and restaurants worldwide. 

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                                Brice and Helen Marden, one of the longstanding royal couples of the New York art world, divide their time between their city studios and an estate in rural Tivoli, in upstate New York. They also dabble in real estate—they have a house in Hydra, Greece, and own the lush Golden Rock Inn in Nevis. And so, when Tivoli's beloved old hotel and restaurant, the Madalin, went dark, they stepped up and bought it, transforming its Victorian B&B interior into a light, bright, art-filled clubhouse for locals and creatives. The Wall Street Journal likened the project to Martin Scorsese deciding to run a diner. 

                                The Madalin's transformation into the Hotel Tivoli was a family affair—the Mardens' photographer daughter, Mirabelle, joined brainstorming meetings (she's the one who suggested tinting the Douglas fir floors purple). And she paired her parents with her high school friend Laura Flam, an interior designer, who, with her colleagues at Reunion Goods & Services, orchestrated the overhaul. "The place is an extension of the Mardens' lives," says Flam, "They're into color and surprisingly open to risk." 

                                Photography by Ingalls Photography, except where noted.

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: The Corner, the hotel's restaurant and bar, occupies the ground floor and the guests rooms are on the second floor. Midcentury Italian armchairs from eBay furnish the bar lounge. 

                                The interior of the hotel was largely preserved. Instead of major construction, the plan was to combat the gloom with a white and gray backdrop. But not just any gray: Brice mixed his own blend by doctoring an undisclosed Benjamin Moore gray with a bit of cadmium orange oil paint. The floors were treated with purple paint that was applied and then dragged to create a subtle finish. 

                                The Corner restaurant/bar at Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: Three of the five principals at Reunions Goods & Services, including Flam, got their start working for Roman & Williams. They were able to flex their muscles the most in the bar, which is clad in Fior de Pesco, a dramatically veined marble (known affectionately around here as ugly marble). Discovered at ABC Worldwide Stone in Brooklyn, it was cut locally. Brice found the vintage pink Murano glass pendant light at Skalar in nearby Hudson, New York. 

                                The Corner bar/restaurant at Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: "The marble has two stripes running across it, one fuchsia, the other purple," Flam told us. "We wanted each color to be showcased but not in an overly bookmatched way. On the bottom of the bar, you can see the fuchsia modeling, and the top is patterned in dark purple—it runs across it like a lighting streak. The rest of the restaurant is very calm. The marble is the big moment." The stools are Moroso's Around the Roses design. (To see more patterned marble, go to Beyond Carrara: 12 Splashy Marble Bathrooms.) 

                                Arists Brice and Helen Mardens' Hotel Tivoli, Tivoli, NY designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: In the main dining room, a midcentury Sputnik light (which Brice also sourced at Skalar) hangs over a Jean Prouvé table and chairs. Note the Brice Gray on the window frames. The walls are a blush-colored plaster—"like Venetian plaster but not polished," says Flam.

                                Moroccan tea glasses at the Corner bar/restaurant at Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista
                                Above: Moroccan tea glasses in the coffee station. Helen sourced the glasses and rugs in the hotel during her travels and also at Imports from Marrakech at New York's Chelsea Food Market.

                                The Corner bar/restaurant at Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: The restaurant opens off the entry hall, with stairs painted the same purple—Bistro Blue from Benjamin Moore—used to treat the floors in the bar and guest rooms.

                                The Corner bar/restaurant at Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: One end of the room has a red leather banquette lit with Alvar Aalto Bell pendants. After looking at "all the chairs in the world," says Flam, the team selected the stackable Cain Chair from Rochester, NY, design collective Staach: "It has very simple angles, it's comfortable, and the fact that it's made in New York won us over."

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: Doors to the guest rooms have their original hardware, and each—now painted Brice Gray—has a hand-painted number on it. Photograph by Reunion Goods & Services.

                                Hotel Tivoli via WSJ | Remodelista

                                Above: Each of the 10 rooms has a metal-framed Parsons Bed from Room & Board in a different color, plus its own bathroom. This room is called the Madeleine because Madeleine Albright stayed in it (in its previous incarnation) when she attended Chelsea Clinton's wedding in Rhinebeck. Photograph via WSJ.com.

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: Paintings by the Mardens and their friends hang throughout the Tivoli. This one is by the late Rene Ricard. The table was one of several antiques found in the hotel and given a fresh look with Hollandlac Brilliant Paints from Fine Paints of Europe. The guest room walls are Benjamin Moore's White Dove (the top choice for an all-purpose white in our 10 Easy Pieces: Architects' White Paint Picks).

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: The throw pillows and blankets are from ABC Carpet & Home. The windows have sheer roman shades plus a blackout roller shade that can be pulled down at night. (See why we're sold on shades in Remodeling 101: Simple Roller Blinds.)

                                Artists Brice and Helen Marden at Hotel Tivoli, their hotel in Tivoli, NY | Remodelista

                                Above: Brice and Helen Marden in a second floor lounge (she's sitting on a chaise that they reupholstered in pink teddy bear fur). A portrait of Helen by Francesco Clemente hangs above her, and opposite one of her own paintings. Photograph via WSJ.com.

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: The hotel is fronted by a porch and dining patio furnished with all-weather Lisboa Chairs from DWR. The designers made use of old iron fencing that the Mardens had in their garage and introduced a new metal hotel sign.

                                Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY, owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                Above: Reunion Goods & Services also designed the hotel's coasters, postcard, and stationery, shown here, which incorporate drawings by Brice. Photograph by Reunion Goods & Services. 

                                Tivoli is about a two-hour drive (or train ride) north of NYC. Rooms start at $210 on weekends. For more details, go to Hotel Tivoli.

                                See more of Reunion Goods & Services's work in An Aspen Ski Bar Inspired by the National Park Service. Reunion recently merged with interior design practice Own Entity, whose work we featured in an Office Visit and Bathroom Roundup.

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                                  "Cycle, travel, and good things," the motto of the Onomichi U2 complex in Hiroshima, Japan, doesn't begin to cover what awaits bicyclists who peddle up to the giant seafront warehouse. Located in the town of Onomichi—and comprising a futuristic cycle-through hotel, a restaurant/bar, bakery, cafe, and shops—the new enclave is situated at the head of the Shimanami Kaido, a scenic 70K trail that leads across bridges and islands. But you might want to just stay put.

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: The complex occupies what had been a drab 1943 maritime structure on the Seto Inland Sea reinvented by local architecture firm Suppose Design Office.

                                  Onomichi U2 Complex Entrance | Remodelista

                                  Above: Wintery planters flank an entry.

                                  Cycle Hotel in Onomichi, Hiroshima, Japan by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: The check-in desk looks formal, but bikers are welcome to peddle right up. Photograph by Toshiyuki Yano.

                                  Onomichi U2 Interior | Remodelista

                                  Above: The cavernous interior has restaurants and shops at one end and hotel rooms at the other. "Our building materials, wood, mortar, and steel, recall the old houses of Onomichi and the shipbuilding that's been such a longstanding tradition here," the architects write, adding that they were after "the discovery of newness in a place long established."

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: Dual bike racks await in a moody guest room with a wood-paneled ceiling. 

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel pajamas| Remodelista

                                  Above: The perfect souvenir: Onomichi U2 pajamas.

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: Tolix chairs outside the ride-up Yard Cafe.

                                  Onomichi U2 complex Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: Cyclists' footwear on the boardwalk.

                                  Onomichi U2 complex Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: The offerings include a bike shop run by Giant and a terrace for lounging.

                                  U2 hotel and restaurant complex by Suppose Design Office in Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: The restaurant end of the warehouse has an open-plan layout partitioned by concrete columns. The offerings include food to stay and to go. Photograph by Toshiyuki Yano.

                                  U2 hotel and restaurant complex by Suppose Design Office in Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: Wood shelves and bentwood chairs lend the restaurant a human scale. Photograph by Toshiyuki Yano.

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: Waterfront seating on the terrace, which operates as a separate entity from the rest and was designed by Onomichi Share

                                  Onomichi U2 complex Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: A place for post-ride periodical reading.

                                  Onomichi O2 Cafe | Remodelista

                                  Above: The terrace offers furniture to suit every taste.

                                  Onomichi U2 complex Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: The in-house bakery. Photograph by Toshiyuki Yano.

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex shop by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: You might want to bring more than a backpack. Far from just cycling gear, the U2 Shima Shop offers "living rich clothing," plus an array of housewares and plants, too.

                                  Onomichi U2 Japan Cycle Hotel complex by Suppose Design Office | Remodelista

                                  Above: Giant rents wheels and stands ready to offer tune-ups.

                                  U2 hotel and restaurant complex by Suppose Design Office in Hiroshima, Japan | Remodelista

                                  Above: The resort overlooks the cargo-ship-filled harbor with the islands of Setouchi in the distance. Photograph by Toshiyuki Yano.

                                  Explore more at Onomichi U2

                                  Onomichi is a picturesque ancient city in Hiroshima Prefecture. Its famous cycling route traverses six islands.

                                  Go to Hotels & Lodgings to see more of our favorite places to stay around the world. 

                                  And have a look at some of our other cycling-related posts:

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                                    Our Instagram feed has been torturing us all winter with the daily tales of other people's tropical getaways. This week, we're taking a series of vicarious vacations. And we want to see your own travel discoveries. Tag them #RemodelistaTravels on Instagram—on Friday, we'll publish a reader roundup on Remodelista.

                                    Instagram Escapes Remodelista March 2015

                                    Above: A British Virgin Islands shelfie by @yolandaedwards, creative director at Conde Nast Traveler.

                                    Monday

                                    Guana Island Bookshelves | Remodelista

                                    Above: CN Traveler's Yolanda Edwards's Instagram photos led Julie to Guana Island in the BVI, now at the top of our Next Stop list. Take a tour in today's Hotels & Lodging post.

                                    Chimbarongo Lamps from Pet | Remodelista

                                    Above: A lampshade you might actually want to wear? Jaunty, sun-hat-shaped lights are our latest High/Low discovery. (And these examples are woven from recycled soda bottles.)

                                    Tuesday

                                    Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                    Above: On Tuesday, we're making a return visit to the Drift San Jose in Baja, Mexico, a $75-a-night design resort that's filled with DIY ideas. Photograph by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith, courtesy of upstart travel journal Tiny Atlas Quarterly (@tinyatlasquarterly).

                                    Wall flag by Amateurs of Paris | Remodelista

                                    Above: The idea that "every home is a micronation, and every nation needs an emblem" inspired two designers in Paris to stitch a series of flags. Stay tuned for Tuesday's Art & Decoration post.

                                    Wednesday 

                                    Drift House, a B&B in Port Fairy, Victoria, Australia photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of the blog In Bed With | Remodelista

                                    Above: Late one night, photographer Rhiannon Taylor's Instagram feed @inbedwith.me transported us to Port Fairy, Australia, and this artfully revived Victorian. Check in to the B&B with us on Wednesday.

                                    Moroccan tiled side table from Mui Ma | Remodelista

                                    Above: A perfect souvenir from Morocco, this week's Furniture find stands ready to be used indoors or out.

                                    Thursday

                                    HIx Island Vieques | Remodelista

                                    Above: On Thursday, in Hotels & Lodging, Elizabeth Roberts of Ensemble Architecture, DPC leads us to her favorite island destination (not coincidentally, it's designed and owned by an architect). And in Remodeling 101, Janet explores the appeal of polished concrete floors, a material now having its day in the sun not just in tropical places.

                                    Friday

                                    Taos, New Mexico teepees via Aquahaus, #RemodelistaTravels on Instagram

                                    Above: Been anywhere great looking lately? Share your travel finds with us. Use the hashtag #RemodelistaTravels to tag your adventures on Instagram. On Friday, we'll be spotlighting your finds.

                                    It's also Instagram Inspiration week at Gardenista. Use the hashtag #GardenistaTravels to show off gardens from around the world—and watch for the most memorable shots to appear on Gardenista.

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                                      I've been following NYC-based Yolanda Edwards's Instagram feed (@yolandaedwards) for a while now; she's the creative director at Conde Nast Traveler, so I figured I'd discover some good insider-y travel tips along the way (her husband, photographer Matthew Hranek (@wmbrownproject) is another good one to follow). Best find so far: Guana Island, a serene and perfectly private retreat in the British Virgin Islands.

                                      Guana is an 850-acre private island with seven beaches and a handful of cottages and villas for rent. Since 1975, the island has been owned and operated by Henry and Gloria Jarecki (they bought it from another adventurous couple, Beth and Louise Bigelow of Massachusetts, who took ownership of the island in the 1930s and lived in a tent before building six stone cottages for their friends and fellow artists to visit). It's laid-back, but not too laid-back: "Rooms have no TVs or telephones and cell phones may not be used within the sight or earshot of other guests. Guests who wear a bathing suit to breakfast or lunch are requested to wear a cover-up as well. In the evenings, dress is smart casual (slacks, sport shirts, dresses, skirts, or pants)." Sounds perfect.  Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: A cottage with a view, via @wmbrownproject.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: The cottage porch, via @yolandaedwards.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: "Not sure what you call the room where guests have cocktail hour at 6:30, play games after dinner, read during the occasional tropical storm, and meet up with new friends to discuss the night tarpon fishing, but this is where that—and more—happens," via @yolandaedwards

                                      Guana Island Bookshelves in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: The library at the Guana Island Club. Photograph via Guana Island.

                                      Guana Island Bookshelves | Remodelista

                                      Above: Another corner of the library. Photograph via Guana Island.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: The simple spa, outfitted with Red Flower products and a Frette robe. Photograph by Rima Suqi for Insider's Guide to Spas.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: A feathery piece of coral at the beach bar, via @yolandaedwards.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: A whitewashed-stucco-walled bathroom. Photograph via Guana Island.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: Rooms are furnished with a mix of unfancy furniture. Photograph via Guana Island.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: A sitting area. Photograph via Guana Island.

                                      Guana Island in the BVI | Remodelista

                                      Above: A whitewashed villa for rent. Photograph via Guana Island. For more details, go to Guana Island.

                                      Take a look at Yolanda Edwards and Matthew Hranek's weekend escape in Upstate Style: A New York Prefab by Way of Austria. And peruse our Travel Guides for more vacation ideas. Thinking of renting a house? See Greatest Hits: 33 Top Rental Houses Featured on Remodelista.

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                                        If you've stayed at the Ace Hotel of Shoreditch, London, with interiors by Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby of Universal Design Studio, you're probably still reminiscing about the effortless cool of your surroundings. Barber and Osgerby, along with the Ace Hotel team, extended the laid-back Pacific Northwest vibe of the original Ace to the UK location, with a few updates: indigo patchwork, perforated metal storage cabinets, a custom raw denim headboard, and chalky black ceilings.

                                        Ready to move in permanently? Re-create the look with the following elements.

                                        Ace Hotel Bedroom in Shoreditch, London | Remodelista

                                        Above: The rooms are set up for living as well as sleeping. The floors are finished in low-pile carpeting from UK company Brockway.

                                        Ace Hotel Bedroom Headboard in Shoreditch, London | Remodelista

                                        Above: A few carefully placed industrial elements keep the look subtle throughout the hotel. Note the handy headboard pocket for the remote.

                                        Peterson Sofa by District Eight | Remodelista

                                        Above: The Peterson Sofa by District Eight Design has a reclaimed hardwood frame with cast-iron adjustable feet and cream cushions; £2,950 ($4,537) from Such & Such. Another option? Pull out the power tools for a DIY: Instant Built-In Day Bed.

                                        Burlap Simple Mustard Yellow Pillow from Zazzle | Remodelista

                                        Above: Simple Burlap Throw Pillows in a deep mustard yellow are available in a 20-by-20-inch square (shown) and a rectangular lumbar size; $67.95 each through Zazzle.

                                        A.P.C. Patchwork Indigo Atlantic Cushions | Remodelista

                                        Above: Bedroom quilts were custom made by A.P.C. using denim and fabric scraps from past collections; a limited number are available from A.P.C. in London. The Atlantic Pillow is hand-stitched in royal blue over a padded lining and is $125 at A.P.C.; read more about the quilt project in our previous post, Piecing Together an A.P.C. Quilt.

                                        Normann Copnehagen Kabino Storage Cabinet | Remodelista

                                        Above: From Normann Copenhagen, the Kabino Sideboard is made of perforated gray steel and ash (and is also available in white steel); $1,050. Alternatively, Strong-Hold Ventilated Storage Cabinets are $1,132 from Custom Equipment Company.

                                        BB1 Aluminum Pendant Light in Black from Horne | Remodelista

                                        Above: From Original BTC of England, the BB1 Aluminum Pendant is spun aluminum and ceramic, and comes with 60 inches of black and white cloth cord; $395 from Horne.

                                        Parker Mid-Century Round Dining Table from West Elm | Remodelista

                                        Above: The Parker Mid-Century Round Dining Table is made of FSC-certified eucalyptus with a walnut veneer top; $599 from West Elm.

                                        Saarinen Executive Chair in Gray Fabric | Remodelista

                                        Above: Saarinen's Executive Armchair with steel legs and a bouclé or Rivington fabric upholstery is currently $1,320 (marked down from $1,553) at Design Within Reach.

                                        Farrow & Ball Studio Green Paint | Remodelista

                                        Above: Farrow & Ball's Studio Green paint in an Estate Emulsion finish gives ceilings a chalky matte look; $97 for a gallon.

                                        Ace Hotel Collaboration with Billykirk Tray | Remodelista

                                        Above: Available at the Ace Hotel shop, the Ace Hotel x Billykirk "Change Is Good" Tray is made of vegetable-tanned leather that's molded and hand-stitched. Used at Ace Hotel in New York at the front desk, the trays also work well on a nightstand; $35.

                                        Lampe Gras Model in Aluminum | Remodelista

                                        Above: The Lampe Gras Model 304 Sconce Lamp has a cast steel body with a chrome (shown) or black or white powder-coated finish for $360 from Design Within Reach.

                                        Vintage Selvedge Denim Fabric from Etsy for DIY Headboard | Remodelista

                                        Above: DIY a fabric-covered headboard (including a pocket) like the Ace does using Vintage Selvedge Denim Fabric sourced on Etsy; $75 for two yards from Antique Jewelry Supply (find more by searching for denim fabric).

                                        Ace Hotel and Suite Sleep Mattress | Remodelista

                                        Above: For an Ace sleeping experience at home, the Suite Sleep x Ace Hotel Mattress is made of 100 percent natural latex rubber with wool batting and an organic cotton cover. Prices start at $1,749 for the twin mattress through Suite Sleep.

                                        Signal Throw Blanket from Toast in the UK | Remodelista

                                        Above: Margaret Pritchard's wool Signal Blanket is designed on a dobby loom in London and woven at a traditional mill in Wales. It's shown here in midnight blue and white with an olive hem; £240 ($369.57). See more of the line in Material Girl: Margaret Pritchard Has a Way with Wool.

                                        This isn't the first time we've wanted to re-create the look of an Ace Hotel room. See:

                                        Did you know there's an Ace Hotel in Panama City? Take a look at Design News: Ace Hotel Turns Tropical on Gardenista.

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                                        This post is an update. It originally ran on September 17, 2013, as part of our London Design issue.

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                                          We've been intrigued by the artful simplicity of the Drift San Jose in San Jose del Cabo, Mexico, for a while now—see The Handmade Baja Hotel. Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith's photographs of the resort for Tiny Atlas Quarterly'Water issue are a reminder: Look no further for the perfect affordable escape. 

                                          Tiny Atlas is an online and print publication produced by a Bay Area collaborative of photographers, writers, and artists: "It's where we share all the places we love to travel ourselves, as well as how we see our own backyards." #LOVEmytinyatlas, a show of its Instagram community's work, is currently on view at Alite Designs Outpost in the Mission in San Francisco.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above L and R: The Drift's American owner Stu Waddell and his local crew designed and built much of the furniture on-site using concrete and leftover wood. He describes the look as "a combination Baja ranch and industrial loft." Photographs by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: Even the resort's Acapulco chairs are partly homemade: "The steel frames were strung with black twine by our gardener, Benito, who grew up near Acapulco, where his father taught him how to do it." The coffee table is vintage and came from one of Stu's best sources, the Lagunilla Sunday flea market in Mexico City.

                                          SF photographer Maggie Davis, who was recently at the Drift with her girlfriend, calls it "the anti-hotel: somewhere that embraces communal living and building friendships with fellow travelers." Photograph via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: There are eight rooms, no two alike, but each has a polished concrete floor ("a cool surface that looks warm thanks to its natural coloring," notes Stu), a concrete bed platform that appears to float, and an Acapulco chair. The sheets are 100 percent raw cotton from Bed of Vancouver. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: A ledge desk made from a plank of wood. The lucha libre poster came from the Lagunilla flea market in Mexico City. Photograph via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          Photograph via Drift San Jose (@bajacowboy).

                                          Above: "What I loved most about Drift is that so much was custom-made by local artisans," Maggie told Tiny Atlas Quarterly." Even the carafe and glasses in the rooms were hand-blown down the street." To source your own, see 10 Easy Pieces: Bedside Water Carafes. Photograph via @bajacowboy

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico| Remodelista

                                          Above: The hotel's ingenious wall-hung closets are made of welded steel: "Just the right amount of space to hang a hat for a few days," says Stu. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: The cast concrete bathtubs are modeled after the water troughs at local ranches. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, California, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: A concrete shower with a cinderblock ventilation window and a custom rain showerhead made by Solis, the Drift's plumber. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          The chalkboard map in the communal kitchen at Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, Mexico

                                          Above: There's a communal kitchen set up for guests to use. The chalkboard wall details all the things to see and do in and around San Jose del Cabo—the beach (and surfing and diving) are the focus, but there's also a lively arts scene, and you can hike to a swimming hole with a 40-foot waterfall. Go to Tiny Atlas Quarterly to get the details. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose communal kitchen for guests, photograph by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith for Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: A band of chalkboard paint with a message from John Steinbeck to fellow vagabonds. Like the Drift's closets, the pot rack is made of welded steel.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: The kitchen's copper faucet is another Solis the plumber creation. Photograph via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          The outdoor cooking setup for guests at the Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: Guests are encouraged to cook their own meals on an Argentine-style grill stocked with mesquite gathered locally. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith for Petite Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: The swimming pool is "made of nothing more than poured concrete," says Stu. "The rustic quality of the concrete reflects light in a more beautiful and honest way than commercial finishes or ceramic tile." Photograph via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          A homemade concrete fire pit and furniture at the Drift San Jose hotel in Baja, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: The poolside fire pit and surrounding furniture are also concrete. Photograph via @bajacowboy.

                                          Drift San Jose hotel, an $89/night resort in Baja, Mexico, photographed by Maggie Davis and Vanessa Smith via Tiny Atlas Quarterly | Remodelista

                                          Above: Clara, the Drift's adopted dog, rests in front of a guest room window that doubles as a door. Photographs via @TinyAtlasQuarterly.

                                          Drift San Jose Hotel in Baja, Mexico | Remodelista

                                          Above: All of the rooms have windows that open to the central courtyard. Photograph via @bajacowboy

                                          Drift San Jose is located 20 minutes from the Los Cabos International Airport in the downtown art district of San Jose del Cabo, near the tip of the Baja peninsula. Rooms are $75 per night, and are booked through Airbnb. Go to Drift San Jose for more details.

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                                            Last week I had a surprise late-night visitor. I was in bed not wanting to call it a day, so I turned to Instagram, and at that very moment the mysterious @inbedwith.me ("expert on big beds and room service") signed on to follow me. Intrigued, I checked out her Instagram feed and found exactly the night-owl inspiration I was looking for. 

                                            In Bed With is the just-launched site of Melbourne architectural photographer Rhiannon Taylor, who travels almost nonstop for work and decided to capture her favorite accommodations along the way. So far, she's presented bespoke guesthouses, spas, and resorts in Australia, Indonesia, Mexico, and the US. I like the look of all of them, but I'm particularly drawn to Drift House, a B&B set in a deftly remodeled Victorian in Victoria, Australia—added bonus: It's on the Great Ocean Road in a seaside town called Port Fairy. Taylor classifies its interiors as "intellectually romantic." 

                                            Photography by Rhiannon Taylor for In Bed With (@inbedwith.me), unless otherwise noted.

                                              Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photograph by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Drift House occupies one of Port Fairy's most well-known historic residences; built in the 1850s, its many past occupants include an undertaker, accordion player, and captain of the militia. Owners Colleen Guiney and Jon Watkinson bought it in derelict condition and traded busy careers in Melbourne (she as a visual merchandiser/stylist, he as a sales and marketing exec) to become innkeepers. Over the course of several years (and many permit battles), they overhauled the property with architect Tim O'Sullivan and his team at Multiplicity design of Melbourne.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photograph by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Wicker chairs that Colleen found on eBay stand outside the entrance to Suite One. There are four suites in total, two in the original house and two in a new addition. Each occupies its own floor.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photograph by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: The interiors are also the work of Multiplicity in collaboration with Colleen, who sourced the furnishings. Suite One, which occupies the ground floor of the historic house, has a sprightly Scandi palette.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photograph by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Each suite has a kitchen and living area (plus its own outdoor space). Suite One's sofa is the Nook by Jardan, the pendant light came from Spence & Lyda, and the green-and-white cotton blanket is a Country Road design.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road | Remodelista

                                            Above: A stone bath from Roger Seller's Apaiser line is poised next to the bed and fireplace. Photograph via Drift House.

                                            Guest "breaky hamper" at Drift House in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photograph by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: On arrival, guests are delivered a "breaky hamper," containing, among other things, eggs from a nearby farm (for cooking in the room), locally made yogurt, muesli, jam, and sour dough bread, and the inn's own lemons and dukka (a spice mix). "We top off the hamper during the stay," says Colleen.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road,| Remodelista

                                            Above: Suite Two has a moody, artist's atelier vibe. Colleen, who studied art (and formerly built sets and props), contributed the wall mural, which incorporates colors from the harbor and details about the house's past owners. The sofa is another Nook by Jardan. (Read about Jardan here.) 

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above L: The mural wraps around into the bedroom. Above R: The round table is Mark Tuckey's Tripod design. (We're longstanding fans of Tuckey's work; see A Sydney Surfer Sets Up Shop and Steal This Look: Mark Tuckey's Beach House Living Room.)

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road | Remodelista

                                            Above: The occupants of Suite Two have the upstairs veranda to themselves.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: For outdoor dining and people watching. Port Fairy has been singled out as one of the world's most livable towns. It's home to famously beautiful stretches of coastline and is also known for its community-organized annual folk festival (this year's event takes place March 6–9).

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Located in the new two-story addition, Suite Three is a white cocoon with slatted partitions built from wood taken out of the old house during the remodel. The painting is by Colleen.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: The modern-cabin bedroom.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: "To be honest, you probably wont leave the room," says Rhiannon. "Periodicals, books, and movies will have you wrapped up on the couch."

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above L: Suite Three's floor-to-ceiling-tiled shower. Above R: A corner of the living room with a wall built from local stone.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Suite Three comes with a private walled courtyard and giant fireplace.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: Multiplicity's finishing detail for the B&B: a backyard pool.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: The après-beach spot.

                                            Drift House guesthouse in Port Fairy on Australia's Great Ocean Road, photographed by Rhiannon Taylor of In Bed With | Remodelista

                                            Above: The new addition is sheathed in perforated metal. "When l first saw the building, it reminded me of an old TV series called The Ghost and Mrs Muir," writes architect Tim O'Sullivan, who chronicles the project (and the permit battles) on Multiplicity's site. "We came up with the idea of mimicking the original building's footprint in width and depth, and to sit [the new addition] back about a meter, so that it reads as a ghost of the front building, the silent twin brother who always lurks in the shadows." The trees are Norfolk Island Pines that predate the original house.

                                            Drift House in Port Fairy, Victoria, Australia | Remodelista

                                            Situated at the end of the Great Ocean Road on Victoria's southwest coast, Drift House is about a four-hour drive from Melbourne. The B&B overlooks the Moyne River and is an easy walk to the beach.

                                             

                                            Traveling in Australia? Take a look at the hotels, restaurants, and shops in our City Guides.

                                            For another of our favorite B&B's, this one in Tielrode, Belgium, go to Surrealism Included.

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                                              Our architect friend Elizabeth Roberts clued us in a while back to her (and many fellow designers') favorite winter escape: Hix Island House, a wabi-sabi, eco-friendly hotel in Vieques. Here's her account.

                                              "Designed by Toronto-based architect John Hix, Hix Island House is a perfect blank slate for viewing the surrounding nature; the contrast of the rugged, natural landscape with the geometric forms of the hotel is simply lovely. Until recently, Vieques (a small island off the east coast of mainland Puerto Rico) was a US Navy testing site for bombs and missiles; now, the beaches are wildlife refuges. I suggest renting a jeep to explore; the Bioluminescent Bay and the beaches are a must."

                                              Hix Island House in Vieques | Remodelista

                                              Above: The hotel is set on a verdant 13-acre parcel.

                                              Hix Island Exterior in Vieques | Remodelista

                                              Above: "The buildings are made of block and reinforced concrete and surfaced with plaster; the exteriors are clad in chain-link fencing, which allows vines to climb up the sides," says Roberts.

                                              Hix Island Hotel in Vieques | Remodelista

                                              Above: "The bedrooms feature Marimekko bed linens and custom furniture."

                                              Above: "There is no need for air-conditioning or heat—the concrete radiates the sun's warmth during the night and the winds keep the rooms feeling cool and practically bug free. I especially love sitting on my private terrace at dusk and listening to the transition from bird calls to insects and frogs after the sun sets."

                                              Hix House in Vieques | Remodelista

                                              Above: "Each room has its own kitchen; it's a nice change to cook simple meals while on vacation. I might stop for a few provisions at one of the bodegas on my way to or from the beach, but aside from that, there's no need to shop."

                                              Above: "The windows are free of glass and are situated to align with the prevailing winds and the sun's path."

                                              Hix Island Hotel Vieques Bathroom | Remodelista

                                              Above: "The hotel's cotton robes are available for purchase. When it's snowing and miserably cold in New York, we're reminded of tropical evenings spent on the hammock at Hix."

                                              Above: "Among the many design details I admire: The custom wood furniture. I love the contrast of the rough-hewn, natural wood against the smooth, polished concrete."

                                              Above: "Early morning yoga in the open studio is a good way to start the day, followed by an outdoor shower."

                                              Above: "The simple modernist pool is defined by a slab concrete wall." For more information, go to Hix Island House.

                                              Go to Hotels & Lodgings to see more destinations with notable designs, including A Ski Cabin by a World-Renowned Swiss Architect and Fontevraud Abbey in France.

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                                              This post is an update; the original ran on January 13, 2012, as part of our Salle de Bain issue.

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                                                Rosa Park (@rosaliapark) and her partner, Rich Stapleton (@rvstapleton), launched Cereal ( @cerealmag), a quarterly magazine about travel and lifestyle, in 2012. We've been following them on Instagram for a while now and they seem to float from one beautiful place to the next: from Copenhagen to Lisbon to London and back home to Bath, England. Their recent trip to the Maldives in the Indian Ocean had us in full envy mode.

                                                Cereal Magazine in the Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: They started at the Lux Maldives.

                                                Cereal Magazine in the Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: "Our bedroom."

                                                Lux Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: "Checking out of Lux Maldives."

                                                Cereal Magazine in the Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: Next, they alit at the Conrad Maldives on Rangali Island.

                                                Madoo in the Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: "Lunchtime at the Mandhoo Restaurant," set on stilts 100 yards out in the Indian Ocean.

                                                Madoo Restaurant Maldives | Remodelista

                                                Above: The interior at Mandhoo Restaurant at the Conrad Maldives.

                                                Conrad Maldives Outdoor Dining | Remodelista

                                                Above: The outdoor lounging area at the Conrad Maldives. 

                                                Rangali Maldives Hotel | Remodelista

                                                Above: "Our bedroom at the Conrad Maldives."

                                                Maldive Spa | Remodelista

                                                Above: The dock leading to the Conrad Maldives spa.

                                                Beach Path Maldives Cereal Magazine | Remodelista

                                                Above: "The path to the beach."

                                                Conrad Maldives Rangali Island | Remodelista

                                                Above: "Postcard palm tree."

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                                                For more beach getaways, see:

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                                                  LA nightlife impresario Dustin Lancaster opened Bar Covell on Hollywood Boulevard in Los Feliz a couple of years ago; now he's offering five suites (upstairs) for patrons who want to stay a bit longer. Located in a nondescript 1930s brick building, the Covell Hotel comes to life thanks to designer Sally Breer of Co-Mingle. Here are our favorite spaces.

                                                  Hotel Covell Gold Door in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The gilded entrance with signage by Marjory Garrison signals Hollywood-style glamour to come. 

                                                  Hotel Covell Living Room | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A pink-velvet-upholstered Eileen Gray Bibendum chair anchors the Chapter 3 room, which is meant to evoke a Parisian atelier.

                                                  Hotel Covell Velvet Banquette | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A lighting fixture by Brendan Ravenhill illuminates the dining table in the Chapter Four suite.

                                                  Hotel Covell Green Velvet Wall | Remodelista

                                                  Above: An upholstered banquette covered in green velvet echoes the Eileen Gray Bibendum chair in the living room.

                                                  Hotel Covell in Los Feliz | Remodelista

                                                  Above: In the kitchenette, a tile floor from Kismet

                                                  Hotel Covell Kitchen | Remodelista

                                                  Above: Each kitchenette comes with a black Smeg refrigerator.

                                                  Hotel Covell Tiled Sitting Area | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A lounging corner off the kitchenette.

                                                  Hotel Covell Desk | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A pair of sconces by Brendan Ravenill

                                                  Hotel Covell Couch in Los Angeles | Remodelista

                                                  Above: A couch in the Chapter 5 suite

                                                  Hotel Covell Bedroom with Green Niche | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The bed linens are from LA-based Parachute

                                                  Hotel Covell Bath | Remodelista

                                                  Above: The bathroom in the Chapter Three suite features a strip of marbelized trim tile and brass fixtures for a bit of subtle glamour.

                                                  Hotel Covell Los Feliz | Remodelista

                                                   

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                                                    "I’m a born and raised Brooklyn girl who turns out to have a soft spot for the country," says Casey Scieszka. "Before moving to the Catskills last year, I lived around the world in places as far-flung as China, San Francisco, Morocco, and Timbuktu. Literally. I’m a writer and graphic designer, which is what I did full time before I had this crazy idea to open an inn."

                                                    "A tall, bearded guy"—Casey's husband, children's book author and illustrator Stephen Weinberg—joined her in this venture, and together the two have hammered and nailed one of the most inviting weekends away from New York. "Nine rooms. One bar. So many stars," is how they bill their bed-and-bar, now named the Spruceton Inn.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills via Far and Close | Remodelista

                                                    Above: The guest house is set in a defunct 1960s motel, Schwarzenegger’s Sunshine Valley House. ("Yep. That Schwarzenegger," says Casey. "It was built by Arnold's cousin Karl.)

                                                    Situated in a green valley with a farmhouse (Casey and Stephen's new quarters), the place hadn't been touched in decades: "We're talking cracked teal linoleum, ancient brown carpets, faux wood paneling, and one long strip of oil-powered baseboard heat for entire building," says Casey. "But the bones of the place were great." She and Stephen hired a father/son carpenter duo to help them tackle things beyond their DIY abilities, "like replacing windows, installing new trim, and bringing the bathrooms down to the studs. We also had an electrician and plumber bring things up to date." All else? They kept things uncomplicated and did it themselves. Photograph via Far and Close.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills via Far and Close | Remodelista

                                                    Above: The hotel has nine rooms, each with bedside tables that Casey and Stephen built using their own barn wood. Framed maps—"vintage but still accurate"—hang throughout the inn. As for the faux wood walls, all they required was some white paint.

                                                    Spruceton Inn, Catskills, NY | Remodeista

                                                    Above: "My guiding design idea was to let the great outdoors be the star," Casey tells us. "That’s why there are so few things in the rooms—and big picture windows. It’s very purposefully muted and streamlined, so that the guest experience can be focused on returning to the simple pleasures of life: waking up in a cozy bed with a view of a wild meadow and mountains, going for a stroll, having a beer by the creek." Photograph via Far and Close.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodelista

                                                    Above: A homemade barn wood bench and Ikea clothes rack. (See 10 Easy Pieces: Metal Clothes Racks for more ideas.) Photograph by Sarah Jayne Ellis.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodelista

                                                    Above: "The bedding—and curtains, too—are actually just painter’s drop cloths sewn down to size and washed to softness," says Casey. The paintings throughout are by Stephen—all created since the couple headed for the hills a year ago. Photograph by Sarah Jayne Ellis.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills via Girl Gift Gather | Remodelista

                                                    Above: Under the drop cloths are duvets—much needed this winter. The bedside globe light is from Ikea. Photograph via Girl Gift Gather.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodelista

                                                    Above: The rooms are TV-free, but there are towels aplenty. The carpets are indoor/outdoor Mad Mats woven from recycled plastic. Photograph by Tim Hannifan. 

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills via Near and Far | Remodelista

                                                    Above: The bar/breakfast room is furnished with the couple's barn wood tables, Ikea folding chairs, and Stephen's art. Photograph via Far and Close.

                                                    Spruceton Inn bar/breakfast room via Girl Gift Gather | Remodelista

                                                    Above: For breakfast, there's coffee and Pop-Tarts (and a great diner down the road). Several of the rooms also have well-stocked kitchenettes. Photograph via Girl Gift Gather.

                                                    Innkeepers Casey Scieszka and Michael Weinberg of the Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodeiista

                                                    Above: Michael and Casey dubbed their bar Conan's Corner. They serve West Kill Brewing craft beer, along with wine and cider. And perhaps to ensure that they always have interesting company, the two run an Artist-in-Residence Program open to visual artists and writers that offers six recipients each a weeklong stay at the inn throughout the year. Photograph by Ryan Essmaker via The Great Discontent.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills via Near and Far | Remodelista

                                                    Above: A bouquet in a can.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodelista

                                                    Above: Stephen painting the motel eaves. Photograph by Casey Scieszka.

                                                    Spruceton Inn in the Catskills owner Casey Scieszka at work on furniture for the hotel | Remodelista

                                                    Above: Casey building the Spruceton bar. Photograph by Stephen Weinberg.

                                                    Fire pit at the Spruceton Inn in the Catskills | Remodelista

                                                    Above: There are three fire pits on the property and four Weber grills. S'mores fixings and other country staples are for sale in the canteen.

                                                    Spruceton Inn, a stylishly revived motel in the Catskills, NY | Remodelista

                                                    The hotel is located in the town of West Kill, New York, about two hours north of NYC (and not far from the upstate towns of Phoenicia and Hudson). For more details, go to the Spruceton Inn: a Catskills Bed and Bar.

                                                    Go to our Travel Guides for more of our Hotel & Lodging tips, including:

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                                                      Ten years ago, Michael L. Cioffi, a high-powered Cincinnati-based corporate lawyer with a passion for Renaissance history, celebrated his 50th birthday with his extended family by renting a villa in the green hills of the Val D'Orcia in Tuscany. His house had been restored and revived by Rome designer Ilaria Miani, and Cioffi was so impassioned by its ancient-meets-modern minimalism— and by the landscape itself—that he bought his own crumbling villa nearby and put Miani on the job. That was the first of a long series of projects he presented Miani and team with—because gradually Cioffi found himself acquiring much of the all-but-deserted 900-year-old village of Castiglioncello del Trinoro, just up the hill from his house.

                                                      Cioffi now presides over a boutique hotel, the Monteverdi, three surrounding rental villas in formerly boarded up 13th-to-16th-century structures, a blue-chip art gallery (and artist-in-residence program), a music festival, and a chapel (where last summer Wes Anderson screened one of his shorts for guests). Oh, and there's a spa opening this July.

                                                      Cioffi's passion project is set up to be sustainable, but he insists he's more interested in creating his own "Renaissance movement for the 21st century" than making a profit. And, he points out, the 10 or so residents who were in the village when he arrived are still there—as are 60 new employees. Take a look.

                                                      Photography via Monteverdi Tuscany.

                                                      The restored hilltop village of Cstiliglioncello del Trinoro in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: This is not a movie set, though it's no wonder that Wes Anderson made the pilgrimage. The hamlet sits atop a hilltop with magical views all around. 

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The hotel occupies a cluster of 16th-century buildings. Designer Iliara Miani's challenge was familiar to her from years of working in the region: The Val D'Orcia is a UNESCO World Heritage site, and no exterior changes can be introduced. 

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi family suite in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: On the interiors, Miani was able to transform what had been last used as a 30-room pensione into 10 spacious rooms and suites, no two alike. Shown here, the Vergilius Room has twin beds on wheels that can be pushed together or apart. The room can be combined with the adjoining one to create a family suite.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi 's custom lighting by Liora Miani | Remodelista

                                                      Above L and R: Miani's custom lights are her 21st-century answer to castle torches. Travel + Leisure dubbed her look "elegant monastic."

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Owner Cioffi loves luxurious bathrooms and made it Miani's mandate that no two look anything alike, and that each offer sinks and showers with views. Shown here, Suite Sant'Andrea's stone sink original to the structure and clever hanging accessories caddy. The toiletries are made with ingredients from small farms by La Saponaria.

                                                      Hotel Monteverde Il Pozzo suite with 18th century copper bathtub | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The star feature of the Il Pozzo Suite is an 18th-century copper bathtub under the original beams.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi La Pieve suite | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The Tuscan-farmhouse-inspired La Pieve Suite has a wood-burning fireplace and a king-size bed (Cioffi is tall and decided that king-size should be the norm).

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi La Pieve suite bathroom | Remodelista

                                                      Above: A modern Stone Age sink paired with travertine in the La Pieve bathroom.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi Suite del Bosco | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Suite del Bosco is intended to conjure "a walk in the forest." The sculptures are Ilaria's "nod to the village farmers who used similar structures to dry grains." All the linens in the hotel and villas are supplied by venerable Italian company C&C Milano.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi Val D'Orcia suite, ideal for honeymooners | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The honeymoon-ready Val D'Orcia Suite offers an en suite bathtub and sink for two, and heated towel bars

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi restaurant Oreade | Remodelista

                                                      Above: With its rock walls, the hotel restaurant, Oreade, has a cozy subterranean feel (though it's on the first floor).

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi Enoteca courtyard | Remodelista

                                                      Above: A shady terrace extends off the in-house wine bar.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi's terrace garden | Remodelista

                                                      Above: A terraced garden wraps around the back of the hotel.

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi infinity pool | Remodelista

                                                      Above: There's also an infinity pool.

                                                      Rental Villas

                                                      Hotel Monteverdi garden in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: There are three rentals that range from two bedrooms to six, and each has its own terrace and outdoor sitting area. They start at €6,500 ($6,860) per week.

                                                      Villas at Monteverdi Villa Muri Antichi library | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The six-bedroom Villa Muri Antichi comes with a library in pale greens with original archways. 

                                                      Villas at Monteverdi Villa San Pietro | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The smallest of the villas, the San Pietro, has a compact kitchen. And did we mention that cooking classes are available?

                                                      Villas at Monteverdi Villa San Pietro bedroom | Remodelista

                                                      Above: One of the San Pietro's two bedrooms. 

                                                      Villas at Monteverdi Amiata Villa | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Villa Muri Antichi has a fortress-like stone facade.

                                                      A rental villa at Monteverdi in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Vine-shaded outdoor dining—with built-in lighting.

                                                      The Village

                                                      The road to Monteverdi in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The road to Castiglioncello del Trinoro.

                                                      The restored village of Castiligilioncello del Trinoro in Tuscany, setting for the Monteverdi hotel and villas | Remodelista

                                                      Above: Most of the stone structures are now part of Monteverdi, but the restoration has avoided a Disneyfied feeling.

                                                      Doorways in the restored village of Castiglioncello del Trinoro in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above L and R: Historic doorways are another reason to come.

                                                      The 12th century chapel at Monteverdi | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The 12th-century chapel, formerly a near ruin, has been fully restored inside and out and now has first-rate acoustics. In addition to church services and weddings, concerts, talks, and performances regularly take place here.

                                                      The cyprus-lined road to Siena from Monteverdi in Tuscany | Remodelista

                                                      Above: The cypress-lined road from the village heading toward Siena. Castiglioncello del Trinoro is located midway between Rome and Florence. It's a two-hour drive from the Rome airport. For more details and reservations, go to Monteverdi Tuscany.

                                                      Planning a trip to Italy? For our favorite hotels, restaurants, and shops, consult our City Guides. Another Tuscan art hub and hotel that we recommend is Villa Lena. On Gardenista, take a look at Sting's Tuscan Vineyard Estate.

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                                                        Every room at the Hotel Henriette, newly overhauled by Paris designer Vanessa Scoffier, is a lesson in the transformative powers of paint and a few well-chosen (but affordable) furnishings. It's at the top of our Where to Check In Next list—with thanks to our travel writer friend Emily Mathieson for the tip-off. And in the meantime, we're taking inspiration for our own homes.

                                                        Photography from Hotel Henriette, except where noted.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The 30-year-old Left Bank hotel, yards from Les Gobelins metro (and formerly known as the Hotel Résidence les Gobelins), was given a makeover by Vanessa Scoffier of Les Nouveaux Decorateurs. Working on a tight budget and with a directive to make the place feel "both accessible and exclusive," she came up with a look that's "vintage, bohème, and très DIY." 

                                                        Shown here, the winter garden off the lobby (which is still being completed). "From a young age, I've scoured flea markets," says Scoffier, who mixed "every style and époque to make modern with the old." 

                                                        Hotel Henriette Paris breakfast room/restaurant | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The breakfast room's custom wool bench cushions establish the palette Scoffier, a former fashion editor, used inventively throughout—and without ever repeating herself.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: There are 32 guest rooms, no two the same, but all surprisingly affordable: They start at €69 ($73.75) for a single and go up to €149 ($159.19) for connecting rooms for two to four people. 

                                                        Like the striped quilts? Hedge House sells similar Bedrolls.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: The remodel took 14 months to complete, and in lieu of introducing expensive millwork Scoffier used plywood and paint. We love plywood, too; see Remodeling 101 and The Unexpected Appeal of Plywood

                                                        This room is a Deluxe Double, 23 square meters (approximately 248 square feet). The bedding was sourced from Bodie and Fou (see more ideas below). Photograph by Hervé Goluza for Glamour France.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above L: Scoffier created Hotel Henriette's paint colors herself. Above R: Every room has a work area. For similar designs, see 10 Easy Pieces: Desks for Small Spaces

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Soulful old rattan and brass metalwork are recurring themes. One of Scoffier's best sources: Les Puces du Design, a flea market devoted to 20th-century design.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: A two-toned double with a mural of mirrors. Find similar Rattan Mirrors from Two's Company. 

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Another inventive—and easy to replicate—paint job in an 11-square-meter (118-square-foot) Happy Single, the smallest room in the hotel.  (See more multicolored paint jobs in Go Big or Go Home: 10 Geometric Painted Walls.)

                                                        Hotel-Henriette-Paris-Remodelista-16.png

                                                        Above: A vintage leather gym mat is hung as a headboard. (Take a look at variations on the theme in 10 Favorites: Vintage Gym Equipment as Decor.) The rope light is the Flax Light by Dutch designer Christien Meindertsma from Thomas Eyck.

                                                        Hotel-Henriette-Paris-Remodelista-18.png

                                                        Above L and R: A tiled bathroom in a double room. Note the use of humble bouquets (and occasional floral patterns) to add color and life.

                                                        Hotel-Henriette-Paris-Remodelista-16.png

                                                        Above: Palest pink stands up to soft turquoise in a 15-square-meter (161.5-square-foot) Chambre Twin. Photograph via Avenue Lifestyle.

                                                        Hotel-Henriette-Paris-Remodelista-16.png

                                                        Above: A headboard made from painted salvaged doors. (Discover more ways to put doors to work in 5 Quick Fixes: Doors as Decor and A Door-Filled Bistro in Bucharest.)

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Scoffier detailed a room in hot pink paint; no-commitment washi tape also works (see The Power of Pink and Washi Tape as Decor).

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: A low-key tropical look in a junior suite. Find out where to source leafy wallpaper in 13 Favorites: Rooms with Flora and Fauna Wallpaper.

                                                        Hotel Henriette in Paris designed by Vanessa Scoffier | Remodelista

                                                        Above: Tea in bed. For more bedding sources, see Mix-and-Match Linens from France and 5 Favorites: Pale Pink Linen Sheets—or head straight to Merci.

                                                        See more of Vanessa Scoffier's work at Les Nouveaux Decorateurs.

                                                        Hotel Henriette is located on a cobblestone street in the 13th Arr., close to the Mouffetard district.

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                                                          When art stars Brice and Helen Marden took over the Hotel Tivoli, the Wall Street Journal likened the project to Martin Scorsese deciding to run a diner. Julie recently checked in for a night. She returned beyond impressed—and ready to channel their fearless way with color (French's Mustard yellow, included). 

                                                          Hotel Tivoli in Tivoli, NY owned by artists Brice and Helen Marden, designed by Reunion Goods & Services | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The Mardens remodeled the 10-room hotel in collaboration with designer Laura Flam and her colleagues at Reunion Goods & Services of NYC. Take a tour in our post The Artists' Retreat: Brice and Helen Marden's Hotel Tivoli. "The place is an extension of the Mardens' lives," Laura told us. "They're into color and surprisingly open to risk."

                                                          Here's how to re-create this bright bedroom—with thanks to Laura for sharing all the details. The Roman shades (which have concealed blackout shades that can be pulled down at night), she reports, were made by Timshell Rivers Studio of Brooklyn: "They also provided the fabric (they represent very nice and moderately priced mills)." 

                                                          Parsons Bed from Room & Board | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Room & Board's Parsons Bed comes in five sizes and 14 colors (Blossom, shown here); $999 for queen size.

                                                          White Pickstitch Matelasse Quilt from Serena & Lily | Remodelista

                                                          Above: Serena & Lily's white Pickstitch Matelassé Quilt is $258 for the full/queen size. It's also available in natural, navy, and aqua.

                                                          Berg Throw from DWR | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The Norwegian lamb's wool Berg Throw, designed by Torbjørn Anderssen and Espen Voll and made in Norway by Røros Tweed, is 79 by 53 inches; $375 from DWR

                                                          Piet Hein Eek bedside table from The Future Perfect | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The hotel is filled with art and interesting objects made or collected by the Mardens, such as Dutch designer Piet Hein Eek's Bedside Table in Scrapwood. It comes in a matte or high-gloss finish (with six coats of water-based lacquer); $535 from The Future Perfect. (See more of Hein Eek's scrap wood designs here.)

                                                          Grasshopper Lamp designed by Greta Grossman from DWR | Remodelista

                                                          Above: A 1940s design classic reissued by Gubi, the Grasshopper Lamp by Greta Grossman, comes in six colors; $875 at DWR. The room's other bedside light is a vintage design from eBay.

                                                          AA Airborne Butterfly Chair | Remodelista

                                                          Above: There are a lot of butterfly chair options out there: See Object Lessons. "I always buy butterfly chair frames vintage from eBay. They have the right patina and new reissues sometimes have some subtle design changes that aren’t as nice as the original," says Laura. "I buy Butterfly Chair Covers from Circa50 in Vermont. Amazon and a bunch of others also offer them, but Circa50 sells them in a few sizes and has a simple guide to help you measure which vintage size you purchased to buy the right cover for it." 

                                                          We also like longstanding French manufacturer AA Airborne's stitched canvas butterfly chair covers. They are waterproof and come in 15 colors; the Basque Red cover (shown here) is €126 ($135.24), marked down from €251 ($269.40).

                                                           

                                                          Dusty Pink Throw Blanket from My Blue Meadow on Etsy | Remodelista

                                                          Above: From Etsy seller My Blue Meadow, this machine-knit Pale Dusty Pink Throw Blanket of 100 percent natural linen yarn is $45.90.

                                                          Moroccan Tuareg Mat from Kelly Behun | Remodelista 

                                                          Above: Helen Marden gathered the Tivoli's Moroccan rugs during her travels and from Imports from Marrakech in New York's Chelsea Food Market. Laura notes that Tuareg rugs, such as the one pictured next to the bed, "tend to be very pricey when they're in large sizes." This mid-20th-century Moroccan Tuareg Mat of straw and leather, 10 by 7 feet, is $3,000 on 1st Dibs from Kelly Behun Studio. "Pieces of bigger rugs are less expensive," adds Laura. "I personally stole this look for my own house by buying a mat from an African importer at a flea market. Small ones pop up on eBay too sometimes."

                                                          Benjamin Moore Bistro Blue | Remodelista

                                                          Above: The hotel's old wood floors were given a purple cast with Benjamin Moore Bistro Blue paint. The walls are painted Benjamin Moore White Dove and the gray window trim is Brice Gray, a mix of an undisclosed Benjamin Moore gray that Brice himself doctors with cadmium orange oil paint. 

                                                           

                                                          Vintage flatweave klim from J&D Oriental Rugs via 1st Dibs | Remodelista

                                                          Above: A Vintage Moroccan Flatweave Kilim, 5 feet 4 inches by 13 feet 3 inches, is $5,500 from J&D Oriental Rugs via 1st Dibs. Source much less expensive options via Etsy seller Art of Vintage Souk

                                                          Explore the rest of the hotel in our post The Artists' Retreat: Brice and Helen Marden's Hotel Tivoli.  And to go Reunion Goods & Services to see more of the firm's work.

                                                          Get more ideas from our Steal This Look archive, including:

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                                                            Our friends at Freund von Freunden, the Berlin-based online style mag, heard we were coming to town and shared their favorite places to eat, drink, and be merry. Here they are in their words, and in no particular order.

                                                            Top 5 Coffee Bars

                                                            ORA Coffee Bar in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Just-opened Ora, in Oranienplatz, is located in a gorgeous former pharmacy with original antique cabinets and woodwork. Photograph via Stil in Berlin.

                                                            Nano Coffee Bar in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Coffee is a big thing in Berlin and choosing one place is hard; Nano is definitely in our top five.

                                                            Barn Roasters in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: The Barn Coffee Roasters is a favorite with local coffee connoisseurs. Photograph via The Coffeevine.

                                                            Chapter One Coffee in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Chapter One Coffee is yet another high-quality cafe created by avid coffee bean lovers. It's worth trying their slow coffee variations.

                                                            Distrikt Coffee in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above Located in the heart of Berlin in Mitte, Distrikt Coffee is known as much for its breakfast menu as for its excellent coffee.

                                                            6 Favorite Restaurants

                                                            Beuster Bar in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: The area around Weserstrasse in Berlin's Neukolln district is booming with gourmet destinations; one that stands out and is definitely worth a visit is Beuster Bar.

                                                            Cocolo Ramen Restaurant in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Cocolo makes the best and most authentic ramen in town. Photograph via Foursquare.

                                                              Lokal Restaurant in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Lokal serves contemporary German cuisine in a beautifully rustic dining room. (See more at A Rustic Modern Hangout in Berlin.) Photograph via Lost in Cheeseland.

                                                            Le Bon in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: In a city where Sunday brunch is a religion, Le Bon puts an end to all searches.

                                                            Maedchen Italiener Restaurant in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Madchenitaliener is a small Italian bistro with amazing genuine pasta and a selection of great cheeses and cured meats; cozy, familiar atmosphere.

                                                            Themroc Restaurant in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Themroc, a French restaurant in Mitte, changes its menu frequently and offers elegantly prepared, simple dishes with fresh ingredients.

                                                            Top 3 Cocktail Bars

                                                            John Muir Cocktail Bar in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: John Muir (named for the California naturalist) serves old-fashioned cocktails in a brick-lined cellar; great atmosphere. Photograph via Tip Berlin.

                                                            Wuergeengel Berlin Bar | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Wurgeengel is a quirky bar known for expertly made drinks.

                                                            Lebbenstern Bar in Berlin | Remodelista

                                                            Above: Lebensstern, in Schoneberg, is a hidden gem offering cocktails in an Old World setting (the famous Cafe Einstein is on the first floor of the villa). Fun fact: Quentin Tarantino filmed scenes for Inglourious Basterds on the premises.

                                                            See some of our favorite gritty and glamorous Berlin restaurants herehere, and here.

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                                                              Most memorable place to stay in town? In-the-know Berliners told us to follow the monkey hoots to a hammock-strung hotel in a midcentury tower called the Bikini-Haus. Prime views of park and zoo included. The 25Hour Hotel Bikini Berlin is a hangout for locals, too, who come for the leafy rooftop restaurant and bar.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Berlin bakery | Remodelista

                                                              Above: The loft-like lobby has a lounge and bakery with a wood-fired oven. The design is the work of Berlin firm Kec Architekten and Werner Aisslinger of Studio Aisslinger.

                                                              Part of the irrepressibly playful 25Hours chain, the 10-story hotel is located in Charlottenberg, right next to the Berlin Zoo and just west of 520-acre Tiergarten Park, once a royal hunting ground. It's part of the revitalized Bikini-Haus (named for its mod, two-part structure), which has been transformed into a concept mall. Photograph via Design Hotels.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikiini Berlin via Pulp Collectors | Remodeista

                                                              Above: To drive home the hotel's urban jungle theme, there's also a hammock area. Photograph via Pulp Collectors.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin reception | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Guests are offered free use of bikes (and the hotel's Mini Cooper). 

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin via 70 Percent Pure | Remodelista

                                                              Above: There are 149 rooms with floor-to-ceiling views of the zoo or the city. Select a zoo room such as this and you'll sleep to elephant and monkey calls from below. 

                                                              The artwork is by Yoshi Sisky who left his mark on many of the walls. Photograph via 70 Percent Pure.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin via 70 Percent Pure | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Wooden walls and floor create an urban cabin vibe. Metal hanging shelves crop up in different configurations throughout. Photograph via 70 Percent Pure.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin Jungle Room M | Remodelista

                                                              Above: The Jungle Room M has a well-situated hammock and en suite bathroom with black fixtures. The hotel's toiletries are supplied by upstart company Stop the Water While Using Me! of Hamburg.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin | Remodelista

                                                              Above: A bed in a wood-paneled niche. 

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin tiled sauna | Remodelista

                                                              Above: On the ninth floor, a sauna with patchwork-tiled floor and zoo views. (For similar tiles, see Patchwork Tiles: 11 Mix-and-Match Ideas.)

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin Neni Restaurant | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Pale wood furniture is mixed with spots of color in the hotel's Neni Restaurant overlooking the treetops.

                                                              Hotel 25Hours Bikini Berlin via 70 Percent Pure | Remodelista

                                                              Above: The space is built from old hothouse parts. Metal planters in suspended wire baskets create a green ceiling. Photograph via 70 Percent Pure.

                                                              25Hours Hotel Bikini in Berlin via Studio Aisslinger | Remodelista

                                                              Above: Rooms at $115 a night. For more details, go to 25Hours Hotel Bikini Berlin or Design Hotels. Photograph via Studio Aisslinger.

                                                               

                                                              Heading to Berlin? Take a look at 14 Don't Miss Restaurants, Coffee Shops, and Cocktail Bars via our friends at Freunde von Freunden,

                                                              Fans of unruly plantings, see 10 Garden Ideas to Steal from Germany.

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                                                                Andrew Glenn and Jonathan Rutherfurd Best are two Brits who, fed up with their careers in marketing and event management, escaped to Waiheke Island in New Zealand to open a boutique hotel.

                                                                Glenn and Best enlisted the help of stylist and designer Katie Lockhart for the interiors and Special Group for graphics and branding. The result is the Oyster Inn, made up of just three guest rooms, a restaurant that seats 80, and a beach boutique. True to form, Lockhart's calm and minimalist interiors highlight some of our shared favorite designers, including furniture by Another Country and Falcon Enamelware in the guest rooms.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: The 80-seat restaurant offers veranda dining under the shade of surrounding palms, where worn metal chairs give a sense of the saltwater air of the island.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Lockhart opted for cane seating in the main dining room with vintage Thonet Era Chairs and a few shelves displaying groupings of objects sourced from the sea: abalone shells, white coral, and seaweed.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Era Barstools surround the bar where guests of the inn and wanderers from beyond can find sangria, lemonade, and a selection of wine chosen by sommelier Clare Dunleavy.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: A 20-seat private room called The Pearl is available for special events catered by chef Cristian Hossack (former head chef at London's Providores). True to its name, the Oyster Inn is the spot to find local Te Matuku oysters.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Room One (of three) has a super king bed and a daybed from Another Country that can be converted to a child's bed.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: In the guest bath, white square tiles set into dark grout contrast with a large circular mirror and accompanying shaving mirror.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Next to the apron sink, guests find white enamel Falcon tumblers and products from Aesop.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Rattan ottomans and wicker furniture sit beneath a black barn pendant lamp and a wall-mounted Marlin.

                                                                The Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lockhart, Remodelista

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: Graphics from Special Group add a whimsical note.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: The Shop at the inn is stocked with clothing and accessories for the beachgoer, including shirts from New York's Saturdays Surf, white-and-yellow Havaianas sandals exclusive to the inn.

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

                                                                Above: The Oyster Inn on Waiheke Island is located just 40 minutes from Auckland by ferry. 

                                                                For more of Lockhart's work, see our post on her shop, Everyday Needs. On the hunt for more antipodean design? Find our other favorite places to visit in New Zealand and Australia in our City Guide section.

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                                                                This post is an update; the original ran on April 22, 2013, as part of our Clean Sweep issue.

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                                                                  Nicole Hollis drew upon Seattle’s rich history of lumber, gold, and sea trading for inspiration in her design for the interiors of the new Palladian Hotel. Housed in a 1910 landmark in happening Belltown, the building provided Hollis and team with an ideal backdrop for her layerings of natural materials such as marble and wood accented with velvet upholstery and metallic touches. The results? A decidedly gritty-glam look befitting the city. 

                                                                  Photography by Laure Joliet

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The landmark building offers iconic views across the Puget Sound.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Hollis cloaked the lobby in the deep blues and greens of Puget Sound. The restored terrazzo floors are original to the building.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: In the moody library, the fireplace is stacked with antique books.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Reclaimed marble from Seattle's old King Street Station lines the stairway walls. 

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Glimmers of gold can be spotted throughout the hotel. 

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Hollis furnished the rooms like lofts, mixing antique area rugs with leather-bound books and old-fashioned telephones. The leather sling chair is by Sit and Read.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The custom lighting throughout the hotel is the work of Ladies & Gentlemen Studio (a Seattle duo who recently decamped to Brooklyn). On the wall is a crocheted Mega Doily Rug made of oversized cotton rope, also by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Brass accents are a staple throughout the hotel, including this kitchen suite. 

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The custom platform beds have reclaimed wood headboards with brass rivets and inset shelving. Celebrity portrait throw pillows (of David Bowie and Bill Murray, among others) introduce interesting bedmates.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Vintage city maps and pieces by local artists decorate the walls.

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: The bathrooms feature custom vanity stands with brass fixtures and vintage-inspired mirrors. 

                                                                  Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

                                                                  Above: Bathroom floors are lined with classic hexagonal marble tiles, and the larger suites have clawfoot tubs.

                                                                  For more details, go to the Palladian Hotel.

                                                                  Nicole Hollis is based in San Francisco and a member of the Remodelista Designer/Architect Directory. To see more work by Nicole Hollis in our posts Old World Meets New World in the Napa Valley and A Serene Sonoma Guest Retreat.

                                                                  See more lighting by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

                                                                  If you're coveting a leather chair, check out these options: 5 Favorites: Modern Leather Sling Chairs.

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                                                                    Designers Kristin Hein and Philip Cozzi of Hein+Cozzi "dumped our sandbox upside down," as they say, and "moved life and studio from the Hamptons to Provincetown, Massachusetts" not too long ago. Growing up, Philip worked summers at Ciro and Sals, a legendary P-Town restaurant co-owned by Ciro Cozzi, an artist and restaurateur. "Everyone, I mean everyone, came—from John Wayne to John Waters, from Robert Motherwell to Norman Mailer," he says. "Provincetown is America's oldest active art colony and we love the sense of community. People pop by and wave, there are impromptu cocktail parties, we ride our bikes out to dinner, to the bank, to the grocery store." 

                                                                    When the Old Homestead, a guest house and local landmark in the East End of town, hit the market, the couple took the plunge. Built in 1850 for Captain Frank Rich, a sea captain and sexton of the Church of Saint Mary of the Harbor, "the property was dilapidated and yet wonderfully untouched," Kristin says. "Through every window there was an idyllic view. We kept the history of the place intact, preserving the original beams, the pine floors, and the brick chimney." The Old Homestead is now a luxe two-bedroom, two-bath rental available by the week, stocked fridge, bikes, and paddleboards included. 

                                                                    Photography by Paul Freehauf.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The veranda overlooks Provincetown Harbor and Cape Cod Bay in the distance. The Paul 13 Lantern is from Remains Lighting, the early American farm table is from Nellie's of Amagansett, and the caned Thonet chairs are from 1stdibs.

                                                                    Old Homestead Inn in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: In the living area, vintage club chairs mingle with an African bench from Juan Montoya in NYC, carved Chinese stools, and a Fortuny fixture from Ralph Pucci (Philip is the former design director of the studio), and the vintage Khotan and Tibetan rugs are from Galerie Shabab in NYC.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The shiplap walls are painted a gray-violet shade from the Guggenheim Collection by Fine Paints of Europe (G020 to be precise). "It feels like the moment before nautical twilight as you gaze out onto the bay," Kristin says.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Kristin and Philip retained the original brick chimney, pine floors, and wood beams. "We did add the shiplap to unify the space," they say.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The oak Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak is $699 from Horne. Have a look at 11 Display-Worthy Clothes Hangers.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The kitchen includes a Bertazzoni range, a narrow Active Smart Fisher Paykel Refrigerator with Bottom Freezer (see our post on the company's dishwasher drawers here), and Tolix Marais stools. (Designing your own compact kitchen? See Skinny Refrigerators and Best Appliances for Small Kitchens for ideas.)

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Glassware from Reidel is stored overhead.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Throughout the house Apartment Pendants with Clear Glass Shades from Schoolhouse Electric are casually wrapped around the existing beams.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The carved Chinese fertility bed is from Julie Hodgess in London (Kristin worked for her design company for a few years before forming Hein+Cozzi with Philip).

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: The bathrooms have Duravit Vero Washbasins and Waterworks Highgate taps and fixtures. The hex tiles are from Oak Park Tile.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Guest rooms are outfitted with organic Saatva mattresses and Society bed linens sourced from ABC Carpet & Home.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: Sliding doors open onto the main living space.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: A shiplap-paneled bath with a Mini Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak for towels and Fresnel adjustable wall/ceiling lights designed by Joe Colombo for Oluce.

                                                                    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

                                                                    Above: "We are 60 miles out into the ocean, the tides rise and fall 11 feet twice a day, the light rivals Greece, the sense of adventure and freedom is palpable," Kristin says. The house rents by the week; for booking information, go to the Old Homestead Provincetown

                                                                    We also recommend the Salt House Inn in Provincetown. And for another old Cape Cod house that we love, see Justine's Soulful Family Cottage (and learn how to make her Cape Cod Beach Plum Jam).

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                                                                      The ultimate job for a Francophile? Laurie Furber, Bay Area–based founder of online housewares emporium Elsie Green, travels to Lyon, France, three times a year to scout for vintage wares. Lyon, the country's third-largest city, is "a bit more low key than Paris and has a great design scene," she says. "The color palette of the city is beautiful, and it's filled with dramatic sculptures, churches, hand-painted frescoes, a Roman amphitheater, and a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and modern architecture. There's a great blend of old and new (the city is 2,000 years old), a vibrant food scene (it's where Paul Bocuse and Daniel Boulud got their starts), and a rich silk production history dating from the 1800s." Here's a roundup of Laurie's favorite haunts.

                                                                      Favorite Hotels

                                                                      Hotel College in Lyon | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "The most design-y option is the Hotel Collège; the owners spent three years searching for vintage school desks and benches to create a classroom and dorm atmosphere. I often stay at the bare-bones Hotel Saint Vincent on the river. It's not fancy in the least, but the owner serves the best breakfast and is warm and welcoming. It's like staying with your favorite old uncle." 

                                                                      Favorite Restaurants

                                                                      Bistro Potager in Lyon | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Le Bistrot du Potager has a great bar and wine list; perfect for a casual lunch or dinner."

                                                                      L'Institution Restaurant in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "L'Institution is an iconic Lyon establishment, built in 1864 and overhauled in 2013 by Jacques Garcia. Another old-school classic is Brasserie Georges, which has the largest dining room in Europe and was established in 1839. They have two seatings, you have to be on time, sit down like a civilized person, and eat what they bring."

                                                                      Gourmand St. Jean in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Le Gourmand de Saint Jean: Lyonnaise specialities served at a sidewalk cafe."

                                                                      Favorite Shops

                                                                      Hyggelig in Lyon | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Hyggelig is a high-end concept store with a Scandinavian twist. Simple silhouettes, playful patterns and colors."

                                                                      Pop and Shoes in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Pop and Shoes is the best clothing/shoe shop in Lyon, and the best place to spot home design trends. It's also a great place for a quick café crème." 

                                                                      Bensimon Concept Store in Lyon | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Bensimon, the French fashion brand, has a nice home collection. Sort of a cool West Elm."

                                                                      August Cocotte in Lyon | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "August et Cocotte has a nice blend of vintage and new housewares."

                                                                      Terreaux Bricolage in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Terreaux Bricolage, a Lyonnaise hardware store, has cloth lamp cord in a range of colors and cool furniture."

                                                                      Galeries du Desordre in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Galerie du Desordre is a very well curated and quirky little gallery of finds from around Europe. The color palette will make you swoon."

                                                                      Les Puces du Canal in Lyon, France | Remodelista

                                                                      Above: "Le Village des Containers Les Puces du Canal is on the outskirts of town; each tiny antiques shop occupies its own shipping container."

                                                                      For a guide to Paris's most happening restaurants, go to Expert Advice: 11 Under-the-Radar Parisian Dining Spots.

                                                                      Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

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                                                                        Sinatra slept here. The sprawling Victorian Chequit inn on Shelter Island, New York's low-key Hamptons alternative, began life as a Methodist retreat and then morphed into a stylish city escape. Under the new ownership of Provincetown hoteliers David Bowd and Kevin O'Shea of Salt Hotels, it's back—big time.

                                                                        Photography via the Chequit.

                                                                        The reinvented Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Built in 1872, the Chequit (which, by the way, is pronounced chee-quit) was initially a dining hall surrounded by a tent camp; it has operated as a hotel since the 1940s. Dowd and O'Shea spent the past year giving it a refresh. Both are veterans of the industry—Bowd is former COO of Andre Balazs Properties (which includes the Sunset on Shelter Island), and O'Shea, a RISD-trained designer, worked on the creative teams at Starwood and Morgans Hotel Group—who have recently started building their own empire: See The Hamptons Come to Cape Cod: Salt House Inn in Provincetown. O'Shea's firm Kevin O'Shea Designs oversaw the refurbishment.

                                                                        The Chequit Inn on Shelter Island | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The porch is, as it's always been, the main gathering place. O'Shea and team preserved as much as possible of the structure's original detailing while giving it "a crisp and contemporary interpretation."

                                                                        The Chequit Inn on Shelter Island | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: "At bed-and-breakfasts you have this incredible personal service experience, but terrible design—it’s like sleeping in great grandma's house,” O’Shea told the New York Observer. “We wanted to keep the guest experience side of it, but create a highly designed place, where we’re pushing boundaries and making something different.”

                                                                        In the lobby, the challenge, he tells us, was that it "had to transcend the seasons: So I kept it light enough for the summer but cozy enough for the winter." 

                                                                        Suite at the revived Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The overhauled guest rooms are finished in a pink and gray palette with dollops of yellow: "The colors were inspired by the incredible light on the island; the rose walls glow throughout the day and soften into the evening," says O'Shea. Shown here, the sitting room in a suite with daybed in an alcove.

                                                                        There are 37 rooms total: 19 in the main house, as well as an additional 17 in separate historic structures known as The Cottage and The Summer House, which can be rented individually or to groups.

                                                                        Bed with scalloped headboard at the revived Chequit Inn, Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Our favorite detail: the custom headboards. "I was inspired by an image of an old motel room I've had in my files for years; it's where the shape came from," says O'Shea, "and the brass finials are a play on Victorian brass beds." The bedrooms are painted in a two-toned blush/French gray mix: Benjamin Moore Sugarcane and Graystone.

                                                                        Two-toned room at the revived Victorian Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The original wood floors were restored and layered with "tribal-inspired" patterned rugs. The yellow Windsor-style chairs are Serena & Lily's Tucker Chair, which comes in eight colors, $188 each. (See more in 10 Easy Pieces: The Windsor Chair Revisited.) 

                                                                        Pink and gray details at the revived Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above L: Brass reading lights and space-saving built-in bedside shelves. O'Shea notes, "You'll never have to go looking for a plug to charge your phone; there are custom plugs on each bedside table from Conway Electric." (Read our Remodeling 101 Primers to learn where to place electrical outlets in every room.) Above R: The all-new bathrooms are tiled in black and white.

                                                                        Black and white bathroom at the Chequit Inn | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: An easy-to-replicate detail: black brackets paired with white open shelves piled with white (and a touch of black) accessories.

                                                                        Beadboard wainscotting at the Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: Classic New England tones and tongue-and-groove wainscoting in the hallway.

                                                                        Red Maple, the restaurant at the reinvented Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The Chequit has a new in-house cafe, as well as a bar/restaurant, Red Maple, shown here.

                                                                          Outdoor tables at the Chequit Inn on Shelter Island, NY | Remodelista

                                                                        Above: The seating extends under the trees. Rooms at the Chequit start at $195 a night. 

                                                                        Looking for a place to stay? Find our best recommendations in our Hotels & Lodging archive, including Salt Hotel's Salt House Inn in Provincetown. And for restaurant and shopping tips, explore our City Guides.

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                                                                          All spas give a go at calming the senses. But London's Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre designed by David Chipperfield Architects is in a luxuriously minimalist class all its own. Crucial ingredient? Lean, clean Carrara marble everywhere.

                                                                          Photography via Hotel Café Royal, unless noted.

                                                                          Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The steam room is at once austerely modern and ancient looking.

                                                                          The spa is situated in the lower two floors of the historic landmark Hotel Café Royal just off Piccadilly Circus, which Chipperfield has transformed into one of London's most glamorous places to stay, exquisitely appointed marble bathrooms included.

                                                                          Chipperfield, not coincidentally, is a master of minimalism: See Best House of the Year.

                                                                          Marble steam room at the Akasha Spa by David Chipperfield, Hotel Cafe Royal, London | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: Chipperfield Architects incorporated state-of-the-art equipment by working in collaboration with spa builders 4SeasonsSpa. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                                          Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A private hammam. Akasha offers an international menu of treatments.

                                                                          Marble wall with steam vents, Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The thoughtfully pared-down detailing extends to the Jacuzzi jets. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                                          Round marble sink at the Akasha Spa in the Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A custom circular marble wash basin with nickel faucets. Photograph via 4SeasonsSpa.

                                                                          Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: Treatment room for two with paneled wood ceiling and copper censers.

                                                                          Marble bath at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The room comes with a soaking tub.

                                                                          High-style sauna at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: World's most glamorous sauna? Photograph via 4SeasonsSpa.

                                                                          High-style sauna at the Akasha Spa by David Chipperfield, Hotel Cafe Royal, London | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The design, complete with domed ceiling, is built from hemlock. Photograph via Architizer.

                                                                          Luxe indoor lap pool at the Akasha Spa at Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: A lap pool with ethereal lighting. There's also a Watsu pool—picture relaxation treatments that involve floating—and a well-equipped gym. Photograph via Trip Advisor.

                                                                          Marble bathroom at the Akasha Spa, Hotel Cafe Royal London designed by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

                                                                          Above: The marble walls in the spa bathroom—and elsewhere in the hotel—were inspired by the surrounding rusticated façades of Regent Street.

                                                                          The Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre is in the Hotel Caf´eé Royal on Regent Street. 

                                                                          To see more by David Chipperfield, go to Best House of the Year and have a look at his countryside-inspired Minimalist Furniture Collection.

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                                                                            On Monday, we visited Patrick Williams' of design-build firm Berdoulat at home in London—see Out with the New: Reinventing the Past in a London Remodel. Today, we're exploring his family's home away from London: one of Bath, England's most beloved historic houses, which Williams spent 18 months overhauling. 

                                                                            The Georgian townhouse at 5 Pierrepoint Place was built in 1748 as the home of John Wood, the Elder, the designer and town planner behind many of Bath's greatest architectural hits, including the Royal Crescent and the Roman Colosseum-inspired Circus. Purchased in a near derelict state, it's been brought back to life by Williams, a restoration expert, ardent salvage hound—and, now, B&B host: He and and his wife, Neri Kamcili have dubbed the house Berdoulat & Breakfast and run it as a two-room inn.

                                                                            Penguin books library at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: Williams's collection of Penguin paperbacks fills his London living room and the library in Bath. Guests are invited to peruse the stacks on request, but asked to "sit with care on the sofa," an original Hepplewhite.

                                                                            English kitchen at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: Williams created the combined kitchen and dining room out of spaces previously used as a dentist's office, Masonic meeting room, and the green room of a neighboring theater among other things. The dining table originally belonged to his great grandfather and was the family table at Berdoulat, his childhood home in Southwest France.

                                                                            The classic English kitchen at Beroulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: "Keen to keep the original paneling of the walls on show, we decided to design the kitchen around a central island, and to match the molding of the panels in the unit's doors," says Williams. "We have our cabinetmaker friend Marcus to thank for the building of the island. He suggested it be referred to as the kitchen continent rather than island given its scale."

                                                                            Brass kitchen taps at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The vintage taps came from "a wonderful man in Bidford on Avon who restores brassware." 

                                                                            Neri Kamcili grew up in Istanbul and offers guests a choice of Turkish or English breakfast.

                                                                             Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: In a corner of the kitchen, an antique rush-seated chair and evidence that Williams and Kamcili's two young children are in residence.

                                                                            Wall papered with historic house documents at  Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: "A paper trail history of the house from before it was built" patterns the entryway. The documents detail how the house was to be built—"from citing the source of the stone through to the color the windows and front door were to be painted," says Williams. "Our paint color dilemma was solved when we discovered these deeds."

                                                                            Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The Elder Suite occupies what was originally the kitchen, and has a stone fireplace that once contained the hearth and bread ovens. Note the headboard created from a salvaged fireplace surround.

                                                                             Bedroom sitting area at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The Elder Suite's sitting area and shuttered windows; learn about interior shutters in Janet's Remodeling 101 post.

                                                                            Antique four poster bed at  Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: An antique four poster in the Linley Suite.

                                                                            Wooden coat hangers on a peg rail at Berdoulat-&-Breakfast-Bath-England-Remodelista-4.jpg

                                                                            Above: The peg rail, a Remodelista favorite. Go to 11 Favorites to find display-worthy clothes hangers.

                                                                             Virgin statue in a guest bathroom at Berdoulat & Breakfast in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: An antique stone statue of Virgin and child migrated from the couple's London master bedroom to the Linley bath.

                                                                            Round bathtub at Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in Bath, England | Remodelista

                                                                            Above: The Linley Suite bathroom comes with a circular tub and brass fixtures, towel warmer included. Curious about the hanging branches? See Design Sleuth: Instant Spa Bathroom.

                                                                            Berdoulat & Breakfast, a B&B in a historic house in Bath England | Remodelista-4.jpg

                                                                            Above: The Georgian house, like so many that John Wood designed, has a façade of local gold-colored limestone now known as Bath stone. Go to Berdoulat & Breakfast for more details and reservations.

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                                                                              Lyon Porter, owner of Urban Cowboy Bed & Breakfast in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, designed a communal kitchen for his overnight guests featuring open shelving, all-white appliances, and some of our favorite accessories. Here's how to get the look.

                                                                              Urban Cowboy Bed and Breakfast Kitchen I Remodelista

                                                                              Above: The clean white kitchen is airy and open.

                                                                              Urban Cowboy Bed and Breakfast Kitchen I Remodelista

                                                                              Above: A well-stocked kitchen with all the essentials; an enamel tea kettle, Italian espresso makers, a water dispenser, and plenty of vin glasses. 

                                                                              Urban Cowboy Bed and Breakfast Kitchen I Remodelista

                                                                              Above: The B&B has four bedrooms in the main house as well as a parlor floor that's open to all guests. The open parlor floor has an operable garage door that opens onto the courtyard, a dining and lounge area, and the all-white kitchen.

                                                                               Key Elements 

                                                                              Viking Gas Range Burner 36-inch I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The white Viking 36-Inch Pro-Style Gas Range with six VSH Pro Sealed Burners is $7,369 from AJ Madison. 

                                                                              Aga Vent Hood in White, Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Aga Wall-Mount Canopy Chimney Range Hood in white is $999 from AJ Madison. 

                                                                              Viking Refrigerator White I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The white Viking 36-Inch, Built-In Bottom-Freezer Refrigerator holds 20.4 cubic feet and costs $9,739 from AJ Madison. 

                                                                              Rohl Shaws Contemporary Classic Single Bowl Fireclay Apron Kit Open Sink I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Rohl Shaws Contemporary Classic Single-Bowl Fireclay Apron Kit Open Sink measures 30 by 18 by 11 inches; $1,035.99 from Home Perfect. 

                                                                              Danze Opulence Single Handle Deck Mount Kitchen Faucet with Spray I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Danze Opulence Single-Handle Deck-Mount Kitchen Faucet with Spray comes in eight finishes (shown in polished chrome) and starts at $316.99 from Wayfair.

                                                                              White Enamel Pendant Light Fixture via Etsy I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: This Pendant Light Fixture with a White Porcelain Enamel Dome Shade is available in five socket colors and you can choose from eight different cord colors; $109 from Olde Brick Lighting via Etsy. 

                                                                              John Boos Walnut Countertop I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: American Black Walnut Butcher Block Kitchen Counter Tops from John Boos come pre-oiled, measure 1.5 inches thick, and are available in several lengths. A top measuring 109 by 25 by 1.5 inches costs $109 from John Boos. 

                                                                              Hemnes Ekby White Shelf Ikea I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: Ikea offers several basic white shelving options. The Ekby Hemnes shelf, 31 1/8 inches wide and 7 1/2 inches deep, is $14.99. Companion brackets also available in several styles. 

                                                                               Tolix Marais Counter Stool in White I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Tolix Marais Counter Stool in white costs $305 from DWR. The stool is also available on gunmetal gray and black. 

                                                                              Accessories

                                                                              Vintage White Steel Enamel Tea Kettle from Crate and Barrel I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Vintage White Steel Enamel Tea Kettle from Crate & Barrel is currently on sale for $49.99 (down from $60). For more, see our roundup of 10 Classic Tea Kettles

                                                                              Bialetti Stovetop Espresso Maker I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The industry workhorse: the Bialetti Stovetop Espresso Maker was invented in 1933 in Italy and is made from cast aluminum; $34.95 from Peet's Coffee (for a six-cup coffee maker). For more, check out 10 Easy Pieces: Stovetop Espresso Makers.

                                                                              Kilner Clip-Top Jar Beverage Dispenser I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The Kilner Clip-Top Jar Beverage Dispenser (smart water supply for a large party) costs $59.99 from Williams-Sonoma. For more, see 10 Easy Pieces: Drinks Dispensers.

                                                                              Jacob Bromwell Colander in stainless steel I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: The classic Jacob Bromwell Colander in stainless steel starts at $149 from Jacob Bromwell. 

                                                                              Large Knife Block by David Mellor in birch I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: This Large Knife Block by David Mellor in birch costs $110 from Heath Ceramics. Here's another 7 Ways to Corral Your Knives.

                                                                              Svalka Wine Glasses by Ikea I Remodelista 

                                                                              Above: Ikea's Svalka Red Wine Glass cost 79 cents each (no need to worry if guests break one now and then).

                                                                              Check out these three Urban Kitchen posts for more inspiration.

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                                                                                Our friends at And North clued us into the newly opened Brunette Wine Bar in downtown Kingston, New York. Owners Jamie (a graphic designer) and Tracy Kennard (a brand consultant) conceived the project as a way to spend more time in the area. We're on board.

                                                                                Photography by Katie Lobel via And North.

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: Feminine (an ornate mirror) meets masculine (plumbing pipe shelves).

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The natural wines are sourced from local producers.

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: Tracy Kennard at the bar.

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: Classic bentwood chairs and detailing evoke a Parisian feel.

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: A brick wall is whitewashed to offset the wine offerings.

                                                                                Brunette Wine Bar in the Hudson Valley | Remodelista

                                                                                Above: The bathroom walls are hung with framed photos of famous brunettes.

                                                                                On the other coast, another favorite local pub is Mill Valley Beerworks.

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                                                                                  Cue the cigar smoke and the gold watch chains. Master set designers Roman and Williams have recast the grand Chicago Athletic Association on Michigan Avenue—right across from Millennium Park—as a playfully posh hotel, Venetian-gothic details intact. Look no further for the perfect place to hole up on Halloween weekend.

                                                                                  Photography via the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel, except where noted.

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Once a gathering spot for Wrigleys, Fields, and Spaldings, the 1890s building was designed by Henry Ives Cobb. Shuttered in recent years, it came close to having all but its facade demolished. Owners Commune Hotels & Resorts hired Chicago firm Hartshorne Plunkard Architecture to oversee the restoration, and Roman and Williams to inject the rooms with new life. Shown here, the pleasingly time-warped drawing room.

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: A reading room with original paneling and stained glass. Photograph via HPA Architecture.

                                                                                  Chicago Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: The structure was built during the city's renaissance years spurred by the Columbian Exposition of 1893. The club only allowed women on Wednesday nights and Sunday afternoons until 1972, and was closed in 1997, but left largely intact. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Window seating and tête-à-tête tables. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                                  Monogrammed doorknobs at the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Monogrammed knobs on a lacquered wardrobe in a guest room. 

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: The 241 rooms have custom metal bed frames and Faribault Woolen Mill blankets woven with the quote: "I miss everything about Chicago except January and February." 

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Referencing old-school gym equipment, Roman and Williams designed desks inspired by wooden stretching racks and pommel-horse-shaped benches. Here and there they also inserted cheeky paintings. "A touch of disorder within the order keeps a space fresh," say the designers. (Go to 10 Favorites: Vintage Gym Equipment as Decor for more.) "

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above L: The racks are cleverly hung with leather storage pouches. Above R: A preserved floor monogram incorporates a fencer's foil. 

                                                                                  Chicago Athletic Association Hotel | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: Bathrooms have Carrara marble and nickel vanities and classic black-and-white porcelain tiles with dark grout. Guest robes are boxing-robe-inspired. Photograph by Nick Fochtman via Chicago Curbed.

                                                                                  The roof restaurant at the Chicago-Athletic-Association-Hotel-designed-by-Roman-and-Williams-Remodelista-3.jpg

                                                                                  Above: The top-floor restaurant, Cindy's, is in a new greenhouse-like addition, modeled after the botanical garden glass houses of the 19th century. "The space is a romantic notion of what might have been on this site before the wave of development swept the fields by the lake," say Roman and Williams.

                                                                                  The Chicago Athletic Association Hotel  | Remodelista

                                                                                  Above: The newly restored Venetian-gothic building rises for 13 stories. It's located at 12 S. Michigan Avenue overlooking Millennium Park. Go to the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel for full details.

                                                                                  For another Roman and Williams design in a dramatic historic building, take a look at New York's High Line Hotel in Chelsea. Heading to Chicago? Peruse our city guide for more finds.

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                                                                                    Turns out, a touch of dark suits the City of Light. Take a look at Dorothée Meilichzon's navy-inflected Art Deco design for the resurrected Hotel Bachaumont in Sentier in the 2ème (within strolling distance of the Louvre). 

                                                                                    Photography by Paul Bowyer.

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Situated in a turn-of-the-20th century building near Les Halles, the hotel is in its second incarnation: A happening place to stay in the twenties, it was later occupied by a medical clinic. Now owned by Samy Marciano of La Clé Group, it recently reopened as a hotel after a three-year renovation.

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Taking inspiration from the hotel's origins, Melichzon and her team at Chzon took a glam retro tack starting in the lobby. 

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Playful combinations of black, white, and blue surface in every room. Most of the furnishings and fittings are custom designed. 

                                                                                     The restaurant at Hotel Bachaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: The hotel's skylit restaurant incorporates backgammon-inspired tabletops, multi-patterned chairs, and navy banquettes. Breakfast for hotel guests is served here; there's also a separate cocktail bar.

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above L and R: The room is detailed with brass bracketed shelves and sconces and an upholstered wall. The lineup of mirrors echoes the lines of the paneling opposite them.

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: The Bachaumont has its own Versailles-style hall of mirrors. 

                                                                                    Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Melichzon specializes in hotel design and is known for her inventive upholstered headboards. There are 49 rooms at the Bachaumont, all in a spectrum of blues. 

                                                                                    Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Each room has a wall-mounted wooden desk, herringbone floor, and brass-accented globe lights. (For lighting that's similar in spirit, see the designs of LA's Atelier de Troupe.)

                                                                                    Hotel Bauchaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above L and R: An executive room with a green-and-white tiled bath.

                                                                                    Hotel Bachaumont in Paris designed by Dorothee Meilichzon | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: A living room suite with marble shelving that incorporates a bar sink. 

                                                                                    Hotel-Bachaumont-Paris-Dorothee-Meilichzon-design-Remodelista-6.jpg

                                                                                    Above: A bathroom for two with a harlequin floor and hex-tiled walls in Suite Bachaumont.

                                                                                    Hotel-Bachaumont-Paris-Dorothee-Meilichzon-design-Remodelista-6.jpg

                                                                                    Above: The room also has a claw-foot tub in a tiled niche.

                                                                                       Hotel Bachaumont in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                    Above: Hotel Bachaumont is well-situated in the heart of Paris.

                                                                                    Taking a trip? Here are three more hotels in our Paris address book:

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                                                                                      Located in the Dutch Kills area of Long Island City (across the East River from New York City's Midtown), the newly opened Boro Hotel is the kind of hotel we can get behind, with just the right mix of novel design solutions (cinderblocks, pallet wood, and color-blocked paint) and modern furnishings (from Hay, Muuto, Plumen, and Tom Dixon to name a few).

                                                                                      The hotel and its 108 guest rooms were designed by architects Matthew Grzywinski and Amador Pons of Grzywinski & Pons; most of the rooms feature broad industrial steel windows for views of the New York City skyline. Some say Long Island City is the new Brooklyn. If that's the case, you can bet Boro Hotel is the Wythe Hotel equivalent.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A monochromatic conference table surrounded by J104 Chairs and J110 Chairs, both in gray, by Danish design studio Hay. A pair of Tom Dixon Offcut Stools sits in front and a wall of original cinderblocks behind.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A glimpse of the original concrete structure, the Comeback Sled Chair by Patricia Urquiola for Kartell, and a library shelf kitted out with volumes from Strand Books in New York City. The hotel's floors are laid with hand-scraped white oak flooring.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel Magazine Rack | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A magazine rack fashioned from white powder-coated plumbing pipes.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel Lounge Area | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A built-in sofa in the lounge area.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A bar built on layered cinderblocks with BluDot's Copper Real Good Barstools and Tom Dixon Cell Tall Pendant Lamps overhead.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A minimalist fire pit in the center of the hotel's lobby and lounge area.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: Hallways to guest rooms are color-blocked with a stripe of gray-blue paint (a color that comes close is Farrow & Ball's Railings paint).

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A custom bed with an upholstered headboard by Grzywinski & Pons, an Accordion Sconce from West Elm, a leather and oak Lean Chair by Add Interior, and the Jasper Morrison Cork Stool.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: One wall of a guest room is lined with pallet wood wainscoting painted in a dusky sage green; a Bruno "C" Arm Desk Lamp by Robert Abbey sits atop a simple table.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel in Long Island City, New York | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A sweeping view of the New York City skyline from Queens.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel Bath | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A Tom Dixon Offcut stool in the generously sized bathrooms.

                                                                                      Boro Hotel Bathroom | Remodelista

                                                                                      Above: A tiled backsplash.

                                                                                      For more nearby design, visit our New York City guide and see our posts:

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                                                                                        On a quick trip upstate a couple of weeks ago, we dropped in on the newly opened Rivertown Lodge on Warren Street in Hudson, NY. Located in a 1920s movie house, the hotel (and soon to be dining spot) is the first venture of Ray Pirkle and Kim Bucci, two friends and hospitality veterans who work under the name Ramshackle Properties.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge solves the vexing neighborhood problem of where to stay on a visit upstate, beyond the usual hotels and Airbnb offerings, according to Ray, who relocated to Hudson a couple of years ago as a "full-time guy," as he says, drawn to the sense of community: "It's a different mentality." 

                                                                                        Ray's aim was to take a slower route when he approached the project, sourcing from within the community and working with collaborators such as Brooklyn-based Workstead. “We knew that we wanted color, and Workstead tends to love muted tone on tone, so we wanted to push that as far as possible," he says. "The idea for us was to stack color on color and pattern on pattern in a muted, diffused way.” The result? Vintage Danish furniture reupholstered in yellows, rusts, and greens; subtle patterns like houndstooth, tartan, and abstract prints from Zak + Fox; and the warmth of cherrywood in the shape of custom woodwork throughout the 27-room hotel.

                                                                                        Photography by Matthew Williams for Workstead, unless otherwise noted.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: Custom log racks designed by Workstead and manufactured by Arrowhead flank a freestanding fireplace by Morsø. The furniture includes two lounge chairs of unknown origin, found on eBay and reupholstered in a custom, pale yellow fabric with houndstooth seats, a plywood table with leather feet by Tyler Hays's M. Crow and Company, and a pillow-covered settee, another vintage eBay find that was re-webbed and reupholstered.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The light-filled lobby is partially partitioned with cherrywood walls designed by Workstead and fabricated by woodworker Markus Bartenschlager. The handwoven garnet jute rug is from Naniquina's Vegetal collection.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: A brass light fixture above the hotel's front desk was designed by Workstead and built by Markus Bartenschlager. Two stools from local studio Sawkille are among a few floating around the property.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The kitchen is located in the hotel's public space; breakfast is made in the mornings and dinner is served in the evenings (Rivertown Lodge is planning a menu of 12 to 14 small plates under Jean Adamson of Brooklyn's Vinegar Hill House starting in mid-December). The kitchen cabinets are painted a deep yellow and the countertops are burnished schist.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: Ray, the former food and beverage director of Soho and Tribeca Grand Hotels, included a selection of Hudson-brewed craft beers on the bar menu. 

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: The bar is painted in Farrow & Ball's Tanner's Brown with cherrywood framing and the bar top ismade from a single piece of bronze. The stools are M. Crow and Company's Jack Stools, which were customized to bar height.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: A custom chair by woodworker David Wright and a built-in cubby by Rowland Butler in the hotel's bridal suite.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: A three-dimensional fibrous waffle textile by Hiroko Takeda hangs above an iron bed by Workstead.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York Photograph by Emma Tuccillo | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: For the bathroom faucets, Workstead sourced classics from Chicago Faucets and stripped off the chrome to reveal the bare brass. The wood doorknob was left unfinished. Photograph by Emma Tuccillo for Rivertown Lodge. 

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: An armchair upholstered in Plus from Zak + Fox (each room has a Zak + Fox fabric upholstered chair) and a built-in bed in a corner cabin.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York Photograph by Emma Tuccillo | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: Workstead's brass Orbit Sconce was custom made for Rivertown Lodge that the studio expanded into a full series.The cherrywood two-poster bed is also an original design by Workstead; it's finished with a matte Monocoat oil. Photograph by Emma Tuccillo for Rivertown Lodge.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge Porch in Hudson | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: A screened-in porch area off one of the guestrooms.

                                                                                        Rivertown Lodge in Hudson, New York by Workstead | Remodelista

                                                                                        Above: An update to the original movie theater sign from 1928, Rivertown Lodge is located at 731 Warren St. in Hudson, New York.

                                                                                        For more on the designers, see our posts:

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                                                                                          The Pearl, an old San Antonio brewery deftly transformed into an entire neighborhood of restaurants, shops, and an outpost of the Culinary Institute of America, has just opened a place to stay. The 146-room Hotel Emma is the work of Roman and Williams, former set designers who have become masters of the historic conversion. Several years in the making, the quarters put original curiosities, such as fermentation tanks and a giant copper engine, to clever use. And there's an overall expansiveness and down-home grace that plants the place firmly in Texas.

                                                                                          Photography via Roman and Williams, except where noted.

                                                                                          The new Hotel Emma in a converted San Antonio brewery, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Yes, this was once a brewery—and in operation until 2001. The eight-story structure was designed in 1898 by August Maritzen who ultimately had more than 80 breweries to his credit and is in the Second Empire style. Photograph via The Rivard Report.
                                                                                          Preserved brewery engine relic in the lobby of the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams. The hotel occupies a former brewery at The Pearl | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Roman and Williams say that in every project they "strive to find the tension between spontaneity and rigor, refinement and rebellion, and past and future." At the Emma, this translated into surprise details, such as an ammonia-powered copper engine preserved in the lobby. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          Lobby at Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: The vast concrete-tiled space is divided into intimate seating areas.

                                                                                          Hotel Emma lobby | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Roman and Williams preserved the decayed brick walls and framework ceiling while giving the space a grandeur. This being Texas, everything is outsized and upholstery is in saddle leather. Photograph by Craig Washburn via San Antonio Magazine.

                                                                                          Library at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: There's even a two-tiered in-house library: The 3,700 volumes were acquired from local novelist and cultural anthropologist Sherry Kafka Wagner. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          The new Hotel Emma Sternewirth bar in a converted San Antonio brewery, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Brewery workers were allowed to imbibe on the job thanks to what was known as the Sternewirth privilege. Located in the building's great hall off the lobby, the Sternewirth bar and clubroom has 25-foot-tall ceilings and three fermentation tanks that Roman and Williams converted into lounges. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          Sternewirth bar with fermentation tank lounge at the new Emma Hotel in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: A closer look at a tank lounge with leather banquettes and metal paneling. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          Sternewirth bar at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Wood and metal seating at the below-the-mezzanine bar. Upstairs books and beer bottles are on display. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          The new Hotel Emma in a former San Antonio brewery designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Original archways and peeling walls have been preserved in the old brewhouse tower guest quarters. There are also rooms in a new wing.

                                                                                          The new Hotel Emma in a former San Antonio brewery designed by Roman & Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: A nice place to plant your hat.

                                                                                          A guest suite at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Room to spare: The tall-ceilinged guest rooms have Herter Brother–inspired four posters.

                                                                                          A guest suite at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: White Frette linens are punched up with embroidered pillows. Note the built-in storage cupboard.

                                                                                          Old-fashioned bathroom at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above Twin pedestal sinks in a blue-and-white tiled bath. The hotel's robes are seersucker made by Pearl's resident guayabera designer Caroline Matthews of Dos Carolinas.

                                                                                          Claw-footed bathtub at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: A preserved factory column alongside a new clawfoot tub.

                                                                                          South Texas provisions at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Provisions from South Texas are sold in a hotel grocery called The Larder.

                                                                                          South Texas provisions at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: A Thanksgiving still life.

                                                                                          Restaurant at the new Hotel Emma in San Antonio designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Bentwood armchairs, wood banquettes, and old-fashioned pendant lights at Supper. Photograph by Scott Martin via The Rivard Report.

                                                                                          Tabetop at the new Hotel Emma, San Antonio, designed by Roman and Williams | Remodelista

                                                                                          Above: Food is a big emphasis: In addition to the bar, the Emma is home to a restaurant called Supper—John Brand is the chef—and has a team of culinary concierges on hand to guide guests.

                                                                                          For two more Roman and Williams designs in dramatic historic buildings, take a look at the Chicago Athletic Association Hotel and New York's High Line Hotel in Chelsea.

                                                                                          Hotel Emma is at 136 E. Grayson St., overlooking the San Antonio River and the northern end of the River Walk, a 15-mile promenade.

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                                                                                            When Sophie Mattiussi, owner of the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels, was converting a 1902 townhouse in the center of Brussels into her four-room bed-and-breakfast, she made the smart move of teaming up with two young local design firms. We love the bare-bones bedrooms that resulted. 

                                                                                            Photography by Charlotte Delval via Atelier Dynamo, unless noted.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The narrow building features a preserved Art Nouveau storefront, previously home to design company Emery & Cie, that now serves as the Happy Guesthouse gathering spot. 

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse Living Room | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The interior has a light-filled Scandi vibe. Sophie, not coincidentally, earned a degree in interior architecture and worked as an event planner before becoming an innkeeper. She serves homemade breakfast at the table (fresh-squeezed watermelon juice and pastries from nearby Nectar & Co.) and advises her guests on what to see and do in the city. 

                                                                                            The Happy Guesthouse in Brussels via Atelier Dynamo, Charlotte Deval photo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The shelves are stocked with a revolving array of art and design books and travel guides. (Sophie has a deal with the Taschen store down the street.)

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels, designed by Julien Renaul and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Sophie collaborated on the remodel with designer Julien Renault, who got his start working in the Bouroullec studio in Paris, and interior architects Atelier Dynamo. After many months of shoring up the structure, the team supplied it with clean, bright interiors and custom furnishings that salute Donald Judd. There's only one bedroom per floor. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                            Minimalist bed frame at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The platform beds are composed of two elegantly intersecting framed rectangles. (It's too bad the cutouts are hidden by mattresses.) Note the strategically placed outlet.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The headboard doubles as a side table. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects and Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Window shelves serve as desks with views of the street. 

                                                                                            Window shelf desk at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels designed by Julien Renault Objects an Atelier Dynamo | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The shelves wrap around wall supports and are subtly angled. Photograph via Julien Renault Objects.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse Brussels bedside shelf/bench | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: On some of the beds the platform extends out to form a long, low shelf. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The designers echoed the framed wood design in the bathroom. 

                                                                                            Framed wood bathroom mirror at the Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The bathrooms artfully make the most of compact space. Photograph via Venuez.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                             Above: For storage, rooms are fitted with built-in cupboards and narrow hanging rods. The guesthouse recently received the Commerce Design Brussels Award of 2015.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels midcentury-style wall rack | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Multiple hanging options in two tones. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse Brussels attic room | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: The attic room has its own balcony. Photograph via Potato and Melk Blog.

                                                                                            Happy Guesthouse in Brussels | Remodelista

                                                                                            Above: Happy Guesthouse is in the heart of the city (near the town hall and the Brussels Central Station) and surrounded by beauty. See more on Facebook (the inn's website still to come); reservations can be made through Booking.com. Photograph via New Places to Be.

                                                                                            Traveling to Belgium (even if just in spirit)? See our favorite shops, restaurants, and hotels in our Belgium City Guide, including a Surreal Antwerp B&B and Fashion's Favorite Fleuriste.

                                                                                            Go to 10 Easy Pieces for more wooden platform beds.

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                                                                                              We like the idea of spending the holidays at a world-class hotel (you deserve it when everything is going to pieces). We're obsessed with the Hôtel Providence in Paris's theater district; a newly opened hotel from restaurateur Pierre Moussié. 

                                                                                              Modern eclecticism meets conspicuous glamour in the interiors. Elodie Moussié, wife of Pierre, designed the interiors with her best friend, Sophie Richard, who updated the 1854 brothel with House of Hackney wallpaper, printed velvet fabrics, antique lighting, and portrait paintings sourced from French country flea markets. Here's a look inside. 

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Hôtel Providence is in the 10th Arrondissement, at 90 Rue René Boulanger.

                                                                                              Above: A pair of velvet upholstered club chairs on the hotel's first floor.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A chinoiserie-style vase, an antique portrait, and glass pendant lights in the dining room.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Gold velvet upholstery on an antique sofa and stacks of fashion books.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Bar stools echo the floral prints of the walls in the bar and restaurant.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A dining room of floral wallpaper and classic Thonet Era Chairs.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: The more minimalist Classic guest room in shades of azure.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A bath behind an Estraido glass partition.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A flea market find by Elodie and Sophie.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: The Attic Suite is coated in Palmeral Wallpaper and fabric. A Palmeral De Beauvor Screen divides the lounge area from the bedroom.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Wallpaper extends to the mansard roof.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Busy print gives way to a serene en suite bath.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A clawfoot tub and marble tile in the bath.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: Meh Meh Velvet Carpet Print wallpaper in the Mini Room and a Meh Meh Tilia Table Lampshade.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: The Superior Bedroom with Haussmann-style windows and dark navy walls.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above L: Each room has a cocktail bar with mixing and measuring tools and a cocktail recipe book. Above R: A brass valet, Flights of Fancy Wallpaper in Pitch Blue, and Flights of Fancy Velvet Fabric lampshades.

                                                                                              Hôtel Providence in Paris | Remodelista

                                                                                              Above: A view from the attic suite onto the streets of the theater district.

                                                                                              For more hotels in Paris, see our posts:

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                                                                                                After years of sneaking in visits to see architecture on our family holidays, my sons are now onto us and wary of our ways. ("Do we really need to see another cathedral?)" Next trip, I’m going stealth with a ski vacation at Chesa Wazzau, a renovated 17th-century Engadine farmhouse in the Swiss mountain village of Bever. Restored and preserved with care by a husband-and-wife team (he’s a photographer and she’s an interior designer) who have owned the property for 30 years, the house maintains its original character and charm—vaulted ceilings, rustic wood framing, and windows embedded into thick walls. With all modern amenities included, my sons won’t even notice that they have skied back in time.

                                                                                                Photography by Christian Küenzi.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau Exterior | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Above the entry at Chesa Wazzau, the sgraffito (Italian for "scratched") plaster decoration framing the small window embedded into a thick wall—a detail designed for heat retention—is typical of 17th-century Engadine architecture. 

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: In the kitchen the thick walls create a deep window sill ideal for the display of potted greenery. Modern kitchen cabinets provide a base for a granite trough sink.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazza Kitchen Orange Door | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: "Much of the furniture was inherited," says owner Christian Küenzi. "Some pieces were already in the house and others have been with us for a lifetime."

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: Vaulted ceilings in one of the house's six bedrooms. It has two baths and sleeps 12.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The small walls embedded in thick walls do a respectable job of funneling light through the interior.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The vernacular wood furniture of the region contrasts with a Wagenfeld Bauhaus Table Lamp and glass side table.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau in St. Moritz | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The palette of rustic wood and white walls extends into the bathrooms.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: A small bedroom with wood floors and ceilings has a balcony from which to take in the Alpine views.

                                                                                                Chesa Wazza Bedroom | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: "It took many years of gentle and respectful renovation to create this idyll and retain the charm and originality of Chesa Wazzau," Küenzi says. "It's an ongoing process; there is always something to do.”

                                                                                                Chesa Wazzau Exterior | Remodelista

                                                                                                Above: The village buildings of Bever represent the vernacular architecture of the Engadine, a long valley in the Swiss Alps known for its sunny climate and proximity to St. Moritz—a five-minute drive. See Chesa Wazzau's location on the map below and go to the site for rental details.

                                                                                                For more snowy idylls, explore:

                                                                                                N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on December 22, 2014, as part of our Winter's Tale issue.

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                                                                                                  Ilse Crawford's design for the Olde Bell Inn, an Elizabethan-era hotel in the UK, is a brilliant mashup of rustic and modern—you can almost smell the wood smoke. Re-create the look with the elements shown below.

                                                                                                   Photographs of the Olde Bell Inn via Design Tripper.

                                                                                                  The Olde Bell Inn Designed by Ilse Crawford via Design Tripper | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Ilse Crawford of Studioilse designed the dining room at the Olde Bell Inn, which features black-painted ceiling beams, chairs, and doorways.

                                                                                                  The Olde Bell Inn Designed by Ilse Crawford via Design Tripper | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Crawford used leather straps to anchor Welsh blankets to high-back benches.

                                                                                                  The Olde Bell Inn Designed by Ilse Crawford via Design Tripper | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Matthew Hilton Fin Chairs for De La Espada (see below) contrast with traditional textiles.

                                                                                                  The Olde Bell Inn Designed by Ilse Crawford via Design Tripper | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Tea is served in traditional red-clay Brown Betty teapots.

                                                                                                  Davey Box Wall Light Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Venerable UK company Davey Lighting began making lights in the 19th century; the Box Wall Light is simultaneously modern and historical; available at Heal's for £438 ($651). For something similar in the US, consider the Union Filament Bath Sconce ($239) from Restoration Hardware.

                                                                                                  English Floor Rush Matting

                                                                                                  Above: Crawford sourced handwoven rush matting from Rush Matters in Bedfordshire, England. English Floor Rush Matting is made to measure, starting at £150 ($223) per square meter.

                                                                                                  Black Salt Chair from Design Within Reach | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The simple Windsor-style Salt Chair in black is $129 from Design Within Reach.

                                                                                                  Bench With Black

                                                                                                  Above: Studioilse's Bench with Black for De La Espada is made of solid chestnut and has copper feet.

                                                                                                  Matthew Hilton Dining Chair | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: UK designer Matthew Hilton's Fin Dining Chair is available in American white oak or American black walnut; $1,125 at De La Espada.

                                                                                                  Tregwynt Welsh Tapestry Blankets | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The dining room banquettes are outfitted with Welsh tapestry blankets. Blankets from Melin Tregwynt's Black and White Collection start at £129 ($192). For a leather strap like the ones fastening the blankets, try the Chestnut English Bridle Leather Strap; $8.50 for the 84-inch version from Outfitters Supply.

                                                                                                  Rae Dunn Ceramic Bee Plate | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Stamped plates are displayed on the dining room walls. For a similar look, San Francisco–based ceramist Rae Dunn makes hand-stamped porcelain plates like this Wide Rim Wafer Plate for $34.

                                                                                                  Peugeot Dark Brown Wood Pepper Mill | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: Peugeot's Dark Wood Pepper Mill is $32.99 at Amazon.

                                                                                                  Brown Betty Ceramic Teapot | Remodelista

                                                                                                  Above: The classic Brown Betty Teapot is made of terra cotta and finished with a brown glaze; the six-cup size is $30.99 at the English Tea Store.

                                                                                                  N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on March 13, 2012, as part of our issue The Celtic Angle.

                                                                                                  Steal This Look is a longstanding weekly Remodelista column. Have a look at all the Steal This Looks in our archive, including A Low-Cost Kitchen for Serious Cooks and A Finnish Cottage Kitchen and Dining Room.

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